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Thread: Am I the only one buying Pd?

  1. #11

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    http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ap/f...
    Is palladium the new platinum? Jewelers in this country may balk, but for cost-conscious jewelry makers in China, the answer is increasingly yes.

    The price of platinum's cheaper, lesser known cousin has risen sharply in the market over the past few years on growing demand from the industrial and investment sectors. But the silvery-white metal has recently found a new end market in China _ in jewelry, as a platinum substitute.

    Palladium has seen expansive growth in the Chinese market as the cost of platinum has risen beyond the reach of the country's less affluent consumers, and market analysts expect to see additional growth this year.

    "We are palladium bulls," JPMorgan analyst Steve Shepherd said in a recent report. "We would argue the potential exists for explosive growth in the fledgling palladium jewelry market _ a market which seemed to appear from nowhere three years ago, in China."

    Palladium prices peaked last year at $396.50 ounce in May _ as most metals did amid sharp gains in the commodities bull market of early last year. After coming down slightly from the peak, the metal has begun its climb again in 2007.

    Palladium started the year at $325 an ounce and has risen about 8 percent to $352 since then. Platinum has made a similar move, from $1,135 in January to about $1,232 currently. The two metals are coincidental; a mine of one typically produces a certain amount of the other.

    Chinese demand for palladium _ like Chinese demand for nearly every commodity _ has contributed to its rapid price appreciation. In particular, the country's demand for palladium in jewelry has surged as platinum has become more expensive.

    Demand for palladium in jewelry stood at about 250,000 ounces worldwide in 2003, mostly due to its use as an alloy with other metals and roughly static with where it had been for years. Then demand ballooned to 920,000 ounces in 2004. It surged again in 2005 to 1.43 million ounces.

    "You've added 1 million ounces to demand in a two-year period," said HSBC analyst Victor Flores. "That is the effect of China jumping into the market."

  2. #12

  3. #13

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    Thanks. I think I've heard most of that stuff before. So, does anybody have any ideas why there are so few people talking about Palladium these days? Are we the only ones who realize how much upside it has in the long term? I hope not. As long as the sky doesn't fall it may be a much better investment to leave to your kids than gold.

    To those who do actually have Pd, what is your favorite? Do you prefer the low cost Pamp bars or the Maples? I was considering getting one of those 10 Oz bars from APMEX, but I don't know if they come with an assay card. Also it didn't show a buy back price. Does that mean that they don't buy them back? I've never sold anything back to them. Actually, I've never sold any PM's. Does anybody (dealer) ever gripe about the purity of the bars or ask for an assay when selling a Pamp or Credit Suisse bar?
    "Greed is Good" - Gordon Gekko, Wall Street (1987)

  4. #14

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    QS: The 10 oz is a little too big for me, think about when Pd is selling for 2K and you have a 20K item you may want to sell. I have both Pamp and Maples, I got the Pamps before they started minting the Maples. I just prefer coins, so my choice are Maples, no good reason for it other than trying to sell the Pamp once it has been opened – this should not be the case with Maples. I have not sold Palladium yet but I have sold gold coins and not being in a plastic bag (if that is what they came in) is not a problem at resale.
    Last edited by Commoner; 03-23-2007 at 04:58 PM.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by QuikSilver View Post
    Hello to all. This is my first post. I guess the biggest question I have is if I'm the only person around here that is actually buying Palladium? I know all the stuff about the Russians manipulating the supply and stuff like that, but as far as a long term investment I think Pd has a lot of upside. I think that in the future (10-25 years) the increased demand for fuel cells will create a major demand for Pd. From my understanding Palladium is only slightly more abundant than Platinum, and we all know how expensive Pt is.

    Anyone have any thoughts on this? I'm still young (under 30) and have time, hopefully, for seriously long term investments. Is that why everyone else shies away from Pd?

    Don't worry, Pd is not my only investment. Any comments would be appreciated.
    you are a genius, palladium is the forgotten stepchild of the precious metals

  6. #16

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    Hey... this would be easy to carry around... without breaking any "$10,000 export-import" rules...

    $50 Canadian face value on a very-recent-date coin worth over $350 US:



    So... you could "technically" travel with $12k "Canadian face value" in your carry-on, no questions asked... though it would be worth ... lessee... about $84k US...
    Last edited by dacrunch; 03-25-2007 at 02:15 PM.

  7. #17

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    I see you took it out of the plastic wrapper. I guess I'm the only one who won't do it.

    Actually the Canadian Palladium, Platinum, and Gold maple leafs all have a face value of 50 Canadian Dollars.

    For the sake of being a nerd, The 10K reporting limit is in U.S. Dollars so, that would be about 11,600 Canadian Dollars or 232 platinum maple leafs or about 278K U.S. Dollars when you convert it back to cash in Zurich (nice city).

    How's that for nerdy?
    Last edited by QuikSilver; 03-25-2007 at 03:59 PM.
    "Greed is Good" - Gordon Gekko, Wall Street (1987)

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by QuikSilver View Post
    I see you took it out of the plastic wrapper. I guess I'm the only one who won't do it.

    Actually the Canadian Palladium, Platinum, and Gold maple leafs all have a face value of 50 Canadian Dollars.

    For the sake of being a nerd, The 10K reporting limit is in U.S. Dollars so, that would be about 11,600 Canadian Dollars or 232 platinum maple leafs or about 278K U.S. Dollars when you convert it back to cash in Zurich (nice city).

    How's that for nerdy?

    okay- I was refering to the palladium ones... platinum is the ticket for that transaction - oh, and the picture is from nwtmint... nice pictures there

  9. #19

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    I bought Palladium yesterday for the 1st time after looking at 2 troubling news items.

    1st was a story on the box about the big Russian Palladium paladium smelter that causes acid rain galore...there are no trees at all within a very large radius and children are getting sick from living near the smelter. This as sad as it is is bullish for the metal.

    2nd is Ding Dong Mugabe in 2000% inflation wrecked Zimbabwe who controls much of the Platinum market.

    The 2 metals do similar catalytic things but Platinum is better from my limited knowledge, however Palladium is much cheaper.

    Me wants to buy some more.

  10. #20

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    I was at my coin dealer yesterday and we discussed palladium a little bit. He recommended avoiding it altogether, thought that gold and silver were both better long term investments. Besides, I'd have to pay 6% GST on any palladium maples.

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