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Thread: Advice for New Stackers.

  1. #1

    Exclamation Advice for New Stackers.

    Been stacking since 2003. I've had my ups and downs like most of us on this forum. I'm now to the point where it really doesn't matter if the price goes up or down. Each time the SPOT goes down I'm quite happy. A gift! If you are new to stacking remember that silver bullion is not an investment (sure it will eventually pay off) but Insurance. The Dollar is under the most significant pressure ever in the history of the United States. I still laugh at the fact that since 2020 something like 6 Trillion Dollars was added to the American Currency and that Silver per oz is like $21... A Joke to say the least. Again, for you all that are new to stacking, simply buy your metals and hide them away. When the time comes to trade for property, cash in for goods and services, etc... You will be sitting pretty. The Dollar is a foregone conclusion. One bit of advice... Stay away from Youtuber's saying "buy now", or "sell now". When you have fake paper currency on hand. Simply BUY and hold. An easy system that will pay off handsomely. Cheers.

  2. #2

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    Agree, buy hold and forget you have it.

    The dollar is dying...trade fake money for real money while you can.

    There will come a day when you dollars are worthless...you will get to trade them for new dollars or Fedcoins at 100 to 1.... 100 old dollars for 1 new dollar.

    I've been warning friends I know that have giant stockpiles of cash....they just wont listen....oh well.
    Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason. -Mark Twain

    The purpose of life is to matter, to be productive, to have it make some difference that you lived at all. -Leo Rosten

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    11,757

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    I agree, 'Buy & Hold' is a good strategy for the long term. Especially gold.
    ...be your own Health Care System... grow your own and eat well

  4. #4

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    Silver and gold are both very good sources of insurance. All that I've ever purchased I still have hidden away. Just looking for more dips to add to the collection.

  5. #5

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    My advice to new stackers is simple. Don't take it boating with you. There could be an accident.
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

  6. #6

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    I have also been stacking copper rounds. Say what you want, but consider what a few copper pennies would buy 100 years ago. There will need to be change made for items that cost less that a 1oz silver round, which would probably be much of what everyday purchases.
    Now there's no more oak oppression
    They passed a noble law
    Now the trees are all kept equal
    By hatchet, axe and saw.

    I will not comply.

    The Tea Party... quietly plotting to take over the world,
    and leave you the hell alone!

  7. #7

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    Think holding long term.
    Buy on pull-backs and market dips.
    Buy what is easily recognized and is liquid at close to spot.
    Always have cash ready to buy a bargain price.
    Don't buy when market is high.

    Just a few thoughts...good luck everyone!
    Stacking since the late 1970's

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by t00nces2 View Post
    I have also been stacking copper rounds. Say what you want, but consider what a few copper pennies would buy 100 years ago. There will need to be change made for items that cost less that a 1oz silver round, which would probably be much of what everyday purchases.
    i stacked copper rounds as well in the form of all copper pre '82 cents. probably around 800 pounds. got them all for face value from $25 bank boxes. the kids and grandkids will think i was crazy some day. the only sorting i did was that i only pulled the wheats, indians, steels and copper canadians out. i wonder what key dates or errors are in those containers? i hope someone someday can find hidden treasures.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by maxwellsilverhammer View Post
    i stacked copper rounds as well in the form of all copper pre '82 cents. probably around 800 pounds. got them all for face value from $25 bank boxes. the kids and grandkids will think i was crazy some day. the only sorting i did was that i only pulled the wheats, indians, steels and copper canadians out. i wonder what key dates or errors are in those containers? i hope someone someday can find hidden treasures.
    I have been stacking Jefferson nickels in much the same way... $100 box a month.
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

  10. #10

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    I've been doing the same thing as you guys, too. I haven't bought the bank boxes, but I do pick the nickels and pre-82 cents out of my wife's and my pocket change and we've got several jugs filled to their brims as well as rolls of them (I weigh the 82's, keep the coppers, and wrap and deposit the Zincolns). I also keep the wheatbacks separate, along with the Canadian cents and nickels.

    Incidentally, I'm not sure if you guys know this (you probably do), but the Canadian nickels from 1922-1936, 1937-1942, 1946-1951, 1955-1962, 1963-1964, and 1965-1981 are comprised of 99.9% nickel- currently at $11.04 per pound, but I seem to recall it having hit around $15 per pound a few to several months ago. It adds up quickly. Whereas our own U.S. nickels are 75% copper and 25% nickel- still a good, cheap stacking metal @ face value, just not quite as good as the Canadian coins. Apparently, the Canadian nickels from 1942-1943 were 88% copper and 12% zinc, weirdly enough, nearly the opposite of what the U.S. did from 1942-1945, the "war nickels" years where the U.S. Mint added 35% silver in an effort to use less copper.


    I'm sure you guys have your own favorites, but one of the sites I use to calculate melt on them is CoinApps dot you-know-what. It's useful for also calculating clad, nickel, copper, most of the precious metals and supposedly even bitcoin to gold/silver and vice versa. Using this online tool, you can weigh our nickels by quantity/rolls, face value or weight. And you can do the same with the 95% copper cents/pennies.

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