Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Thread: Grading questions.....??

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,490

    Default Grading questions.....??

    What half dollars are worth getting graded? I have 1964 Kennedy's that are pretty darn new and bright plus walkers and franklins that are handled but far from being culls...the strikings are quite well defined...not perfect but good.
    I have always been just a generic stacker.

    Ag guy
    live for today, admit your faults, do the right thing (even if you don't want to) & trust God!
    This life is the training of the soul for the life to come. (accept that we live in a fallen world)
    Whether you know it or not, you are a spiritual eternal being! Ag guy

  2. #2

    Default

    Look at www.PCGS.com and see what the coins are worth with high grades. If they aren't worth significantly more graded, don't waste your time and money. pick the ones that have the best chance to come back with a big bonus on a certified higher grade.
    Now there's no more oak oppression
    They passed a noble law
    Now the trees are all kept equal
    By hatchet, axe and saw.

    I will not comply.

    The Tea Party... quietly plotting to take over the world,
    and leave you the hell alone!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    11,754

    Default

    Ebay probably has more accurate values.

    Just go to the completed items to see what years sold with the final prices.

    But t00nces2 says makes a lot of sense. Perhaps the shipping costs both ways, plus add the slabbing costs would be more that the value of the coin. Most set collectors go after MS70 first and foremost.
    ...be your own Health Care System... grow your own and eat well

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,490

    Default

    I still don't know much , but I have about 5- 1962 and 1963 Franklin halves...pretty clean with full bell lines on bottom of the bells. And one clean Franklin with what looks like a small divot in the top part of the head...Kinda looks like a defect in the planchet. Doesn't appear to be from handling. I searched errors and so far haven't found that defect. could be a one off??
    live for today, admit your faults, do the right thing (even if you don't want to) & trust God!
    This life is the training of the soul for the life to come. (accept that we live in a fallen world)
    Whether you know it or not, you are a spiritual eternal being! Ag guy

  5. #5

    Default

    Ag Guy, IMHO, put them in rolls and forget about slabbing them. You won't get any extra form a LCS if they're slabbed.
    Do your own due diligence

    I stand united with my friends & family in Canada who seek freedom.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LongDonSilver View Post
    Ag Guy, IMHO, put them in rolls and forget about slabbing them. You won't get any extra form a LCS if they're slabbed.
    I agree, although I have bags of Franklin, Walkers and Kennedy's I'm really not interested in the time and expense of grading them. I consider grading as 'subjective' and I'm not into numismatic, these will probably someday go to the refiner. But I respect that there are those who travel a different road than I...LOL
    Stacking since the late 1970's

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ag guy View Post
    What half dollars are worth getting graded? I have 1964 Kennedy's that are pretty darn new and bright plus walkers and franklins that are handled but far from being culls...the strikings are quite well defined...not perfect but good.
    I have always been just a generic stacker.

    Ag guy
    Ag guy, here's the thing... It is pretty much as everyone else here has already said. The vast majority of the time, because of various reasons, it's not worth the expense to get Kennedy halves graded. For one thing, the mintages were just too high. A Philadelphia (no mintmark showing) 1964 half dollar had a mintage of 273,304,004- yes, that's hundreds of millions. Much of the mintage was saved by people mourning the loss of the president at the time and they literally saved $1,000 face value bags of them. The Denver minted halves weren't much better, with a mintage of 156,205,446 (again, well over a hundred million). Now, is it possible to search through thousands of them and maybe find an MS-67($400 or so) or an MS-68(approximately $7500) out of a possible MS-70? Yes. Yes, it is, but the chances aren't great. Basically, they'd have to be near perfect.

    BTW, I'm going off of "Greysheet" numbers here- the Coin Dealer's wholesale pricing data. Essentially what a coin dealer would pay to buy your coin(s). If you can legitimately look at the coin with a jeweler's loupe and find no "rub" (wear on the coin) whatsoever and no bag marks or "hits" or scratches on the coin, and the coin has a great strike, and hasn't been "cleaned" then you may have a chance. It's just not a good one- kind of like buying a lottery ticket. Note: the average cost of sending in a coin for grading is somewhere between $15 (for bulk submissions) and say, $45, and the price goes up incrementally with higher values and attributions. I haven't yet mentioned "double dies" for 1964 Kennedy's. They can be very profitable, but obviously, they're pretty darn scarce and you really have to know what you're looking for/at. It takes a trained eye, and that's not to say that you don't have one or couldn't develop one, but I'd also caution that even with the 2 top tier grading services- (you know who they are), grading is subjective- very subjective. It's always a matter of opinion. It's based off of a professional opinion, but an opinion, nonetheless.

    Franklins and Walkers are a bit different. Most Franklins are considered "junk silver", especially when worn. Some collectors like them, but many do not because they're kind of ugly and boring. And the thing with large silver coins like half dollars and silver dollars is that they very easily show wear and/or marks in their larger fields (open spaces without detail) which devalue them quickly in collectors' eyes. Note: it's possible to find certain date and mint marked Franklins with "full bell lines", which often adds a huge premium on them, but they have to be uncirculated and generally in higher grades to make it worth submitting them for grading.

    For Walkers, it comes down to whether or not a coin is a better date, a semi-key date or a key date as to whether or not one should grade. Earlier years are usually best. Common dates, like 1941-1947 (aka the war years or short set) not so much unless they're very high grade. Any better dates or higher on the collectability scale can possibly make it worth grading. There are a lot of low mintage years that often weren't saved. Couple that with the fact that over the last 100 years or so there have been many silver melts, so many of these have also been lost to attrition.

    You have my number, brother. If you send me a photo of the front and back of anything you're considering sending in, I'll always be glad to give you my best estimation.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bronkster1967 View Post
    Ag guy, here's the thing... It is pretty much as everyone else here has already said. The vast majority of the time, because of various reasons, it's not worth the expense to get Kennedy halves graded. For one thing, the mintages were just too high. A Philadelphia (no mintmark showing) 1964 half dollar had a mintage of 273,304,004- yes, that's hundreds of millions. Much of the mintage was saved by people mourning the loss of the president at the time and they literally saved $1,000 face value bags of them. The Denver minted halves weren't much better, with a mintage of 156,205,446 (again, well over a hundred million). Now, is it possible to search through thousands of them and maybe find an MS-67($400 or so) or an MS-68(approximately $7500) out of a possible MS-70? Yes. Yes, it is, but the chances aren't great. Basically, they'd have to be near perfect.

    BTW, I'm going off of "Greysheet" numbers here- the Coin Dealer's wholesale pricing data. Essentially what a coin dealer would pay to buy your coin(s). If you can legitimately look at the coin with a jeweler's loupe and find no "rub" (wear on the coin) whatsoever and no bag marks or "hits" or scratches on the coin, and the coin has a great strike, and hasn't been "cleaned" then you may have a chance. It's just not a good one- kind of like buying a lottery ticket. Note: the average cost of sending in a coin for grading is somewhere between $15 (for bulk submissions) and say, $45, and the price goes up incrementally with higher values and attributions. I haven't yet mentioned "double dies" for 1964 Kennedy's. They can be very profitable, but obviously, they're pretty darn scarce and you really have to know what you're looking for/at. It takes a trained eye, and that's not to say that you don't have one or couldn't develop one, but I'd also caution that even with the 2 top tier grading services- (you know who they are), grading is subjective- very subjective. It's always a matter of opinion. It's based off of a professional opinion, but an opinion, nonetheless.

    Franklins and Walkers are a bit different. Most Franklins are considered "junk silver", especially when worn. Some collectors like them, but many do not because they're kind of ugly and boring. And the thing with large silver coins like half dollars and silver dollars is that they very easily show wear and/or marks in their larger fields (open spaces without detail) which devalue them quickly in collectors' eyes. Note: it's possible to find certain date and mint marked Franklins with "full bell lines", which often adds a huge premium on them, but they have to be uncirculated and generally in higher grades to make it worth submitting them for grading.

    For Walkers, it comes down to whether or not a coin is a better date, a semi-key date or a key date as to whether or not one should grade. Earlier years are usually best. Common dates, like 1941-1947 (aka the war years or short set) not so much unless they're very high grade. Any better dates or higher on the collectability scale can possibly make it worth grading. There are a lot of low mintage years that often weren't saved. Couple that with the fact that over the last 100 years or so there have been many silver melts, so many of these have also been lost to attrition.

    You have my number, brother. If you send me a photo of the front and back of anything you're considering sending in, I'll always be glad to give you my best estimation.
    even for modern franklin and kennedy halves, MS69-70 is quite impossible. It means the coins never been inside a mint bag or in contact with other coins before. PCGS grading only goes to MS68

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
    even for modern franklin and kennedy halves, MS69-70 is quite impossible. It means the coins never been inside a mint bag or in contact with other coins before. PCGS grading only goes to MS68
    Agreed. That is why I said exactly what I said. I did not say that one could find an MS-69 or MS-70. If you'll note, this IS what I said:

    "Now, is it possible to search through thousands of them and maybe find an MS-67($400 or so) or an MS-68(approximately $7500) out of a possible MS-70? Yes. Yes, it is, but the chances aren't great. Basically, they'd have to be near perfect.".

    What I neglected to mention is that many/most stackers and even coin collectors cannot easily differentiate between what constitutes an MS-67 vs an MS-68 vs an MS-69 or an MS-70. It takes paid, opinionated "professionals" with electron microscopes to pass judgment on such lofty goals, and unless you actually "score" one of those grades, you've probably lost money. That is especially true as you have already noted, that for Franklins or 1964 Kennedy halves, there are no MS-69's or MS-70's. Obviously, proof coins would be a different matter than business strikes. I believe that it'd be much more likely to generally find those higher grades coming out of mint sets and special mint sets from 1965-1970 (you know, the 40% silvers) where there's a much higher chance of the coins being undisturbed/damaged as opposed to rolling around in someone's change jar, sock drawer, kept in a hot attic or in someone's dank, wet basement for decades. And even then, with the quality supposedly being higher, the chances still aren't very good.

    I'll say this, though. With this great clamoring to constantly look for the highest of grades (by registry set people and/or those looking to cash in), and with those same people looking to submit coins which were minted in relatively large numbers, is it out of the question to expect that at some point, someone may eventually come up with a higher graded coin than the highest grades that exist currently in those sets?

    I do get your assumption regarding modern coins- especially those that flipped and flopped into bags off of a U.S. Mint conveyor belt. There are, however, instances of not Franklins, but modern Kennedy halves which have apparently gotten MS-69 grades, which honestly, was a surprise to me too. Check out the PCGS population report starting at 1976 and continuing up to 2019. Their population numbers are very low (as would be expected), but there are modern business strike Kennedy's that do exist in that grade.

    My own stack and collection are comprised of popular bullion, old U.S. Type coins, and Pre-33 gold, so I'm not all caught up in this modern coin grading frenzy, even though it looks like it isn't going away anytime soon.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1,490

    Default

    My thanks to all for the feed back.

    Ag guy
    live for today, admit your faults, do the right thing (even if you don't want to) & trust God!
    This life is the training of the soul for the life to come. (accept that we live in a fallen world)
    Whether you know it or not, you are a spiritual eternal being! Ag guy

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •