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Thread: To grade, or not to grade!!!

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by bronkster1967 View Post
    Yes, Sir. It's so hard to find in uncirculated grades, but when you do, the beautiful designs are striking. I recently sold a 1717 J Spanish reale to a guy who had been wanting one for much of his life and he was flabbergasted. He said that he slept with it on his nightstand that night. Lol!
    some coins are just too iconic.
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

  2. #32

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    Just bought these for $95 shipped how did I do?


    https://media.discordapp.net/attachm...s-l1600-66.jpg
    Last edited by windweaver77; 12-09-2021 at 11:10 AM.
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

  3. #33

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    Nice coins WW, you just pick them up?

    I have a couple new ones also that are staggering.
    Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason. -Mark Twain

    The purpose of life is to matter, to be productive, to have it make some difference that you lived at all. -Leo Rosten

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miteysquirrel View Post
    Nice coins WW, you just pick them up?

    I have a couple new ones also that are staggering.
    I did just purchase those coins, yes.

    I am pretty psyched. What did you get?
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by windweaver77 View Post
    I did just purchase those coins, yes.

    I am pretty psyched. What did you get?
    Ill take pics of them when I get home tonight....you will like!
    Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason. -Mark Twain

    The purpose of life is to matter, to be productive, to have it make some difference that you lived at all. -Leo Rosten

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miteysquirrel View Post
    Ill take pics of them when I get home tonight....you will like!
    Those are mighty nice. I don't have any stuff lile that.
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by windweaver77 View Post




    Just bought these for $95 shipped how did I do?


    https://media.discordapp.net/attachm...s-l1600-66.jpg
    Seriously though... should I grade this coin?
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

  8. #38

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    I only grade coins over $500...doesn't make any fiscal sense otherwise.

    You have a very nice coin that will appreciate over time, keep it in a plastic sleeve.
    Politicians and diapers must be changed often, and for the same reason. -Mark Twain

    The purpose of life is to matter, to be productive, to have it make some difference that you lived at all. -Leo Rosten

  9. #39

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    Windweaver, I have to agree with the Squirrel here. You do have a nice coin, but as a grade it would probably come out somewhere between AU-50 and AU-58. And, as you well know, it's difficult to accurately determine a grade of a coin from a photo- even ones as good as the ones you provide. But what I'm seeing is what appears to be "hairline" scratches, which more than likely mean that the coin has been "cleaned" at some point in it's life thereupon hurting its value. I do also understand that your pic is extremely magnified and every little tic can look overblown, but that will be no consolation if/when someone wanted to sell it to either a dealer or another knowledgeable collector as they would most likely lowball you.

    My reasoning for not getting it graded would chiefly be that:

    1) It's book value (even if not cleaned) is approximately somewhere between $125-$150 (if not cleaned), which in IMO as well as Miteysquirrel's, wouldn't be the best use of your financial resources. I too, would only keep it in a 2x2 or acid free plastic flip. I mean if you want to "go crazy" a little, you could put it in an airtite capsule or similar. You'd just want to measure it and get the right size (looks like 28.3mm according to NGC). Obviously, everyone is different, but you'd likely be wasting your hard-earned fiat by getting coins graded that weren't "worth" at least a few hundred dollars and up. It's my opinion, so take that for what it is- just opinion and what's right for me may or may not be right for you too.

    2) If the TPG service actually did slab it, it would possibly or probably come back as an AU "Details" coin, which unless the coin is extremely rare hurts its value and oftentimes is just a waste of money since you could have been putting that wasted money towards more coins/PM's. Again, my opinion based off of the pic provided. Those scratches are telltale.

    3) Currently there have been a lot of complaints regarding even the top 2 most respected grading services (PCGS and NGC), that their grades have been atrociously lacking in precision and accuracy. Some in the industry have said that it's in part due to the Coronavirus; many of the older graders have quit and/or died off or moved along and the companies have hired younger/newer graders that just don't have as much experience. I cannot personally confirm or deny this, but it's what I've heard from numerous coin dealers. Perhaps it might make good sense to hold off on grading coins for now that is, until some time has passed. Or possibly be super strict on what you do send in- basically knowing without a doubt that the grade you're expecting is the one you'd get.

    Just think of the reasons why a collector gets a coin graded and when it's a good idea to do it or not. It's usually to gain authentication from professionals for heavily faked and/or high dollar value, "rare" coins. Your coin is a 1906, which is the highest mintage coin (mintage 6,910,000) from 1902-1910 (not counting the matte proof, of course), so even though it's 115 years old, there are enough around to satisfy reasonable demand. Incidentally, if the coin you had was a 1905 (mintage 1,188,000), one year off from yours, I actually probably would get it slabbed (even if it did come back "details") as its value would be $500-$850, which is a great place for your coins to be money-wise. The price difference (probably due to mintages) is reflected in their respective values.

    I hope I'm not coming off as condescending or as a know-it-all. I'm not. I just honestly believe that you'd get more "bang for your buck" holding off on this particular florin. As a personal note, I've got many older U.S. Type coins worth several hundred dollars each in a Dansco album and none of them have I chosen to get slabbed. I'm comfortable enough with my grading skills and experience in collecting. Plus, I like to be able to see them all in one easily retrievable and displayable place which is obviously much harder to do with that many coins. Also, if SHTF ever happened and I had to beat feet quickly, they're all in one album and not in 100+ different slabs. As I alluded to before, it's a matter of personal preference and opinion. I don't want to discourage you from getting coins slabbed; I just want to discourage you from doing like so many other collectors do which is to get more common coins graded. We've all seen them at coin shows, shops and auctions or wherever one might buy coins. There will be some relatively modern, non-rare coin like a Jefferson nickel or Roosevelt dime with some lofty grade of MS-67 or even a common date U.S. gold coin or 1921 Morgan silver dollar or 1922 Peace dollar in MS-60, 61 or 62 that just wasn't worth it to get them graded. As they say in the industry, "Buy the coin, not the slab" AND "Coin grading is subjective". Always keeping these mantras in mind should be helpful. - E

  10. #40

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bronkster1967 View Post
    Windweaver, I have to agree with the Squirrel here. You do have a nice coin, but as a grade it would probably come out somewhere between AU-50 and AU-58. And, as you well know, it's difficult to accurately determine a grade of a coin from a photo- even ones as good as the ones you provide. But what I'm seeing is what appears to be "hairline" scratches, which more than likely mean that the coin has been "cleaned" at some point in it's life thereupon hurting its value. I do also understand that your pic is extremely magnified and every little tic can look overblown, but that will be no consolation if/when someone wanted to sell it to either a dealer or another knowledgeable collector as they would most likely lowball you.

    My reasoning for not getting it graded would chiefly be that:

    1) It's book value (even if not cleaned) is approximately somewhere between $125-$150 (if not cleaned), which in IMO as well as Miteysquirrel's, wouldn't be the best use of your financial resources. I too, would only keep it in a 2x2 or acid free plastic flip. I mean if you want to "go crazy" a little, you could put it in an airtite capsule or similar. You'd just want to measure it and get the right size (looks like 28.3mm according to NGC). Obviously, everyone is different, but you'd likely be wasting your hard-earned fiat by getting coins graded that weren't "worth" at least a few hundred dollars and up. It's my opinion, so take that for what it is- just opinion and what's right for me may or may not be right for you too.

    2) If the TPG service actually did slab it, it would possibly or probably come back as an AU "Details" coin, which unless the coin is extremely rare hurts its value and oftentimes is just a waste of money since you could have been putting that wasted money towards more coins/PM's. Again, my opinion based off of the pic provided. Those scratches are telltale.

    3) Currently there have been a lot of complaints regarding even the top 2 most respected grading services (PCGS and NGC), that their grades have been atrociously lacking in precision and accuracy. Some in the industry have said that it's in part due to the Coronavirus; many of the older graders have quit and/or died off or moved along and the companies have hired younger/newer graders that just don't have as much experience. I cannot personally confirm or deny this, but it's what I've heard from numerous coin dealers. Perhaps it might make good sense to hold off on grading coins for now that is, until some time has passed. Or possibly be super strict on what you do send in- basically knowing without a doubt that the grade you're expecting is the one you'd get.

    Just think of the reasons why a collector gets a coin graded and when it's a good idea to do it or not. It's usually to gain authentication from professionals for heavily faked and/or high dollar value, "rare" coins. Your coin is a 1906, which is the highest mintage coin (mintage 6,910,000) from 1902-1910 (not counting the matte proof, of course), so even though it's 115 years old, there are enough around to satisfy reasonable demand. Incidentally, if the coin you had was a 1905 (mintage 1,188,000), one year off from yours, I actually probably would get it slabbed (even if it did come back "details") as its value would be $500-$850, which is a great place for your coins to be money-wise. The price difference (probably due to mintages) is reflected in their respective values.

    I hope I'm not coming off as condescending or as a know-it-all. I'm not. I just honestly believe that you'd get more "bang for your buck" holding off on this particular florin. As a personal note, I've got many older U.S. Type coins worth several hundred dollars each in a Dansco album and none of them have I chosen to get slabbed. I'm comfortable enough with my grading skills and experience in collecting. Plus, I like to be able to see them all in one easily retrievable and displayable place which is obviously much harder to do with that many coins. Also, if SHTF ever happened and I had to beat feet quickly, they're all in one album and not in 100+ different slabs. As I alluded to before, it's a matter of personal preference and opinion. I don't want to discourage you from getting coins slabbed; I just want to discourage you from doing like so many other collectors do which is to get more common coins graded. We've all seen them at coin shows, shops and auctions or wherever one might buy coins. There will be some relatively modern, non-rare coin like a Jefferson nickel or Roosevelt dime with some lofty grade of MS-67 or even a common date U.S. gold coin or 1921 Morgan silver dollar or 1922 Peace dollar in MS-60, 61 or 62 that just wasn't worth it to get them graded. As they say in the industry, "Buy the coin, not the slab" AND "Coin grading is subjective". Always keeping these mantras in mind should be helpful. - E
    Thanks for your input, as always. I've looked at some comps and the coin favors mint state, but possibly cleaned, as you say.

    I won't know much til I get it in my hands. I grabbed a 1922B swiss 5 franc recently, as well.



    I probably really need to stop buying random stuff, huh? Haha
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

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