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Thread: Interesting article I read this morning about our "hobby"

  1. #11

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    Nice. I'm an Arizona native, but I lived in Tulsa when I worked for Williams. But I never saw any burn barrels. I associate them with dirty developing countries, poor people burning their trash, etc, but then I saw some sweet rigs when I googled incinerator recently.

    I wanted better document destruction than shredders, with a more compact end-product. Seems like paper would burn clean enough that no one would complain.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phronesis View Post
    Nice. I'm an Arizona native, but I lived in Tulsa when I worked for Williams. But I never saw any burn barrels. I associate them with dirty developing countries, poor people burning their trash, etc, but then I saw some sweet rigs when I googled incinerator recently.

    I wanted better document destruction than shredders, with a more compact end-product. Seems like paper would burn clean enough that no one would complain.
    Not just paper, our friends incinerator burns everything except metals, and glass. Aluminum will melt but start to clog up the bottom screen. By sorting the trash and burning the garbage, one saves about a ounce of silver a month to add to the stack.

    IMO, when done right like I described its cleaner than any other way of disposing ones trash. The land fills are toxic waste, and the garbage collectors make pollution just collecting ones waste.

    IOW, a well built incinerator burns so hot, it burns clean. Compared to the dummy who just pokes a few holes in the bottom of a burn can. The more oxygen the better the burn, and the right draft. If the whole bottom of a 55 gallon drum is open, you get excellent draft.

    My friend use his used oil he changes from his autos to burn really hot. Excellent way to despose used volatile liquids, ect.. burns so hot even a cup of greasy used oil dont smoke much when soaked into house hold garbage.

    Usually it burns so hot, the whole 55 gallon drum glows red at peak burn.

    Last edited by Westerner; 08-28-2019 at 08:35 AM.
    Small business is the incubator of employment. As it declines, so too do opportunities for first jobs, second chances and economic independence.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Westerner View Post
    As a contractor, I can burn the crud off of copper wires and the recycler has no problem paying me for it, as if it was stripped down copper wire.
    my scrap yard will not take burned copper wiring. they say it is illegal. i am in florida

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by maxwellsilverhammer View Post
    my scrap yard will not take burned copper wiring. they say it is illegal. i am in florida
    It's illegal here too. Inless your a contractor and they do check with the state to see if your a active/legal contractor.
    Small business is the incubator of employment. As it declines, so too do opportunities for first jobs, second chances and economic independence.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Westerner View Post
    Not just paper, our friends incinerator burns everything except metals, and glass. Aluminum will melt but start to clog up the bottom screen. By sorting the trash and burning the garbage, one saves about a ounce of silver a month to add to the stack.

    IMO, when done right like I described its cleaner than any other way of disposing ones trash. The land fills are toxic waste, and the garbage collectors make pollution just collecting ones waste.

    IOW, a well built incinerator burns so hot, it burns clean. Compared to the dummy who just pokes a few holes in the bottom of a burn can. The more oxygen the better the burn, and the right draft. If the whole bottom of a 55 gallon drum is open, you get excellent draft.

    My friend use his used oil he changes from his autos to burn really hot. Excellent way to despose used volatile liquids, ect.. burns so hot even a cup of greasy used oil dont smoke much when soaked into house hold garbage.

    Usually it burns so hot, the whole 55 gallon drum glows red at peak burn.

    On your trash cost savings point, do you not have a fixed garbage bill? I think most places you have to pay a fixed bill for garbage pickup, so reducing your garbage doesn't save you any coin. For residential at least. This is probably because governments control and contract for garbage services for some reason. Do you drive your own trash to a landfill?

  6. #16

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    No trash service. Tried it but the cheapest, and smallest can was about $20+ a month. And we still didn't fill the 60 gallon can every week. All private property, mixed in with bigger ranches and farms. No owners association, though we do get to know our naighbors. I have friends that let me dump a 50# dog food bag packed with glass and tin metal once or so a couple months. Trade favors though.
    Last edited by Westerner; 08-28-2019 at 08:56 PM.
    Small business is the incubator of employment. As it declines, so too do opportunities for first jobs, second chances and economic independence.

  7. #17

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    Just sent half a semi load of scrap, $500, only a bit of clean up from the crusher and yard got cleaned.
    One in a million...GNR ...sums it up nicely

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phronesis View Post
    On your trash cost savings point, do you not have a fixed garbage bill? I think most places you have to pay a fixed bill for garbage pickup, so reducing your garbage doesn't save you any coin. For residential at least. This is probably because governments control and contract for garbage services for some reason. Do you drive your own trash to a landfill?
    In my area, you are free to opt-out of the garbage pick-up service. Not mandatory, but most take advantage of it. My parents, who live in a more rural area, still use a burn barrel.

  9. #19

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    It was a 100 ft. extension cord. We strip wire too, I think it's fun, we just wait for the hottest flippin day of the summer to do it, glove and blade up, cook the insulated wire in the truck bed with topper, makes it easier. But, we won't bother with less than 12 either unless it's easy to do and we have some extra time, we go for the big stuff first, work our way down, and when we get tired of it, that's it. Is it worth the time, who knows anymore. I know for one I won't touch aluminum again, it doesn't matter how much someone's got, .22/lb. doesn't add up fast with aluminum, and it's always work to get it to scrap form, cans different story, still won't touch them, iron .. never thought I would be scrapping iron but at nearly .05/lb. it kicks aluminum to the landfill all day.
    Quote Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
    3.5 for 1 electric cord? are u sure or u mean 3.5/lb even 3.5/lb of cord is very high because spot 0.999 copper today is 2.82 $/lb

  10. #20

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    I don't care what the price is, I save all the aluminum I can get. Cast, sheet, extrusions, cans, I don't care. As long as I got room to store it, I'll save it in anticipation of that next big move to the upside. I'd guess I've got something on the order of at least a half-ton of AL stacked, and none of it cost me anything other than time. And when that next big upside move comes, it will all get sold and converted into AU and AG.
    "It's the lure of easy money - It's got a very strong appeal." - Glenn Frey (The Smuggler's Blues)

    "A wise and frugal government, which shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned." - Thomas Jefferson

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