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Thread: Interesting article I read this morning about our "hobby"

  1. #1

    Default Interesting article I read this morning about our "hobby"

    This was found in the "money" section of MSN:

    "The Big Business of Scavenging in Post-Industrial America"


    https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/mark...ica/ar-AAG6Ziw

    I found it entertaining and informative.

  2. #2

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    it use to be great but metal prices have dropped and there is less incentive to hunt for scrap.
    Also, scrap prices differ from town to town. Some buys circuit boards, some area don't
    I've seen scrapper cutting electric cords that worth 10 cents only to ruin a complete workable microwave, dvd players, tv, vacuum cleaners, etc

  3. #3

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    Yes, I often struggle within myself with decisions about whether to repair tools and appliances I scavenge, or to scrap them. Case in point, the manufacturing company I work for throws out many compressed air powered tools every year, impact wrenches, die grinders, drill motors, etc. Usually they are easily repairable, but how many impact wrenches does one need? Even when repaired to perfect operating condition, they aren't worth much in used, second-hand condition. New ones are pricey, but most mechanics tend to prefer buying new to buying used. So after repairing 5 or 6, lately I've just been tearing them apart for the aluminum bodies. I regret having to do it, but at least they aren't going to the land-fill.

  4. #4

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    I went to the scrapyard Friday, got 3.50 for an extension cord a friend was tossing into the trash, about 7.00 for some brass I had laying around, and 2 bucks for the iron I brought in, so yeah, 13 dollars, most people would have put it into the trash. Scrap is big business, we've got an industrial revolutions worth of metal to deal with. Allot doesn't get recycled, my local landfill is one big stinky hill.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by everything1 View Post
    I went to the scrapyard Friday, got 3.50 for an extension cord a friend was tossing into the trash, about 7.00 for some brass I had laying around, and 2 bucks for the iron I brought in, so yeah, 13 dollars, most people would have put it into the trash. Scrap is big business, we've got an industrial revolutions worth of metal to deal with. Allot doesn't get recycled, my local landfill is one big stinky hill.
    3.5 for 1 electric cord? are u sure or u mean 3.5/lb even 3.5/lb of cord is very high because spot 0.999 copper today is 2.82 $/lb
    Last edited by yellowsnow; 08-24-2019 at 10:35 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    If you don't strip the insulation off wire, you don't get anywhere near spot copper for it. You have to decide if it is easy for you to strip or not and whether it is worth your time/trouble for the higher clean copper price.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by suemarkp View Post
    If you don't strip the insulation off wire, you don't get anywhere near spot copper for it. You have to decide if it is easy for you to strip or not and whether it is worth your time/trouble for the higher clean copper price.
    Personally, I seldom strip any wire smaller than 12 gauge. Once in a while I'll strip 14 ga. but never anything less than that. Just doesn't seem to be worth the time and effort. Not when I can sell it as-is and have to do nothing (albeit at a greatly reduced rate).

  8. #8

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    As a contractor, I can burn the crud off of copper wires and the recycler has no problem paying me for it, as if it was stripped down copper wire.
    Small business is the incubator of employment. As it declines, so too do opportunities for first jobs, second chances and economic independence.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Westerner View Post
    As a contractor, I can burn the crud off of copper wires and the recycler has no problem paying me for it, as if it was stripped down copper wire.
    By the way, slight tangent, is using burn barrels legal in most municipalities in America? I saw some on Amazon but I've never seen anyone using them.

  10. #10

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    What you need is a 55 gallon metal drum. In Oklahoma you can find them for as little as $8. Then you cut the bottom off of them. Then you take three concrete foundation blocks the type with big holes in them and set them down like triangle on there sides so the holes are open. Then set a heavy duty metal grate or old refrigerator wire shelf, etc,.. on the bricks. Then set the drum on the grate. Now you have a okie incinerator.

    Burn your trash to.

    Regarding legality, IDK anything, above is just what I've been told.

    Of note, four bags of kitchen, bathroom, and room garbage, minus glass, metal and biodegradable stuff...
    Will burn to nothing but ashes in less than 30 minutes.
    Last edited by Westerner; 08-26-2019 at 04:52 PM.
    Small business is the incubator of employment. As it declines, so too do opportunities for first jobs, second chances and economic independence.

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