Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Farm Belt bankruptcies are soaring

  1. #11

    Default

    Well the older family farms that have the land paid for need to do something with their money or pay taxes. They are the ones who buy up the older smaller farms as the people retire.

    You can see the older farmers who are well off will spend money on nonfarm items trips and such, but usually these people have no heirs or their heirs aren't interested in farming.

    The ones who hurt the local framing industry are the carpetbagger ones. They really drove up the price of land and almost always do major drainage work too. This adds load to everyone else's drainage in the area. Really a big issue that not much can be done about.
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redraspberry View Post
    I would say around me a large farm is ~1000 to 2000 acres. Some corporate farms are bigger. Smaller farms under 1000 acres. I would bet Saskatchewan has much bigger farms?
    Large farm here can hit 100000 acres, now a large family farm is around 5000-12000 acres, a small piddly farm is like mom's land base - 2000 acres half farmable, half pasture. Damn near any farmer around here will complain how hard it is and how they make no money...the vacations, vehicles and beach homes say that is a lie. My wife worked at a bank years ago and could not believe the amount of old money local farmers had...city girl...I don't have a problem with people getting rich, I do have a problem with government handouts and tax breaks helping you get there
    One in a million...GNR ...sums it up nicely

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redraspberry View Post
    Well the older family farms that have the land paid for need to do something with their money or pay taxes. They are the ones who buy up the older smaller farms as the people retire.

    You can see the older farmers who are well off will spend money on nonfarm items trips and such, but usually these people have no heirs or their heirs aren't interested in farming.

    The ones who hurt the local framing industry are the carpetbagger ones. They really drove up the price of land and almost always do major drainage work too. This adds load to everyone else's drainage in the area. Really a big issue that not much can be done about.
    Around here it's the 30-50 year old farmers doing the trips, vacation homes and holy crap lifestyle. The old ones didn't show off their wealth. Do you farm? I can pretty much tell you don't, do not believe the myths...even the small farmers have net worth that would make your head spin
    One in a million...GNR ...sums it up nicely

  4. #14

    Default

    Over leveraged in Mono-cultured crops that have been subsidized and subsequently dumped into countries like China for years. Eventually, the greed, and good times catches up to them, also locked into Monsanto/Bayer prices, for seed and chemicals. Now China is subsidizing it's own soy farmers and buying from Brazil more into the future as well. Indeed we see the floods every year now on the downstream communities here in Wisconsin.
    Last edited by everything1; 02-12-2019 at 07:00 PM.

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by everything1 View Post
    Over leveraged in Mono-cultured crops that have been subsidized and subsequently dumped into countries like China for years. Eventually, the greed, and good times catches up to them, also locked into Monsanto/Bayer prices, for seed and chemicals.
    That's very true. The RoundUp Ready crops are pretty dominate anymore and hard to keep a pure strain even if you wanted to.

    Many states Illinois included, have legalized hemp. This is a great rotation crop. Easy to grow and a great resource.
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

  6. #16

    Default

    I've heard that some larger growers are finally looking into ways to recondition the soil, it's the only way to get organic label somehow which is what people are demanding and you can charge more. Problem is invasives apparently, like say around here it's canadian thistle, has to be killed off at the root level, which means spray the field with glyphosate. Once they stopped cultivating and went to chemicals it all changed, and no going back, thus .. bankruptcy.
    Hemp, ehhhh. Maybe, hopefully. But your clothes won't wear out as fast, I have some hemp sweaters and they are indestructible. I watched some people grow hemp for CBD and they pumped allot of fertilizer and chemicals on it. Here in WI, it still grows everywhere since it was the #1 for hemp throughout WW II in nation, and being a weed .. well.. So the police waste time trying to cut it back and eradicate it through the years even though it has little THC in it. Meanwhile other invasives ravage, forests, stream lines, and ditches, fields, etc. and that's ok.
    https://www.hempbasics.com/shop/gene...mp-information
    Last edited by everything1; 02-12-2019 at 07:21 PM.

  7. #17

    Default

    They use to grow hemp around Illinois before WWII but stopped afterwards when it was classified along with cannabis as a harmful drug. You would have to fertilize it to get the highest yield and replace the nutrient plant takes out of the soil. It still grows wild around here but is pretty scraggly in the ditches.
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

  8. #18

    Default

    This is a fun hemp historic site. Apparently hemp was really big back in the day. http://hempology.org/
    If you go to the images, we can see that yeah, it was used medicinally long ago.
    But, now everything is chemicals, I struggle to find clean safe foods anymore, and am into researching ways to decrease mercury and chemicals on the foods I do bring home through washing them with .. you got it chemicals, namely bleach. Apparently you can make your own wash for vegetables & fruit, 1/2 teaspoon of bleach to one gallon of water. I don't know if I trust the biofilms that come on anything, let alone buying anything packaged or processed anymore. The FDA just keeps upping the amounts of heavy metals allowed in and on plants. Plants being sequestering will absorb whatever is in the soil.

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by everything1 View Post
    This is a fun hemp historic site. Apparently hemp was really big back in the day. http://hempology.org/
    If you go to the images, we can see that yeah, it was used medicinally long ago.
    But, now everything is chemicals, I struggle to find clean safe foods anymore, and am into researching ways to decrease mercury and chemicals on the foods I do bring home through washing them with .. you got it chemicals, namely bleach. Apparently you can make your own wash for vegetables & fruit, 1/2 teaspoon of bleach to one gallon of water. I don't know if I trust the biofilms that come on anything, let alone buying anything packaged or processed anymore. The FDA just keeps upping the amounts of heavy metals allowed in and on plants. Plants being sequestering will absorb whatever is in the soil.
    I worked at a fresh vegetable processor once. Prepackaged salad mixes, lettuce cabbage carrots and the like. They would shred the goods and then it got dumped into a chlorine/water mix. Was then pumped around the room in a clear 6" PCV pipe to mix and kill the bacteria. Then it was put into big spin dryers and packaged.

    Dawn detergent would get off most surface chemicals.

    We made baby carrots. LOL when they came in from Canada they were huge 24" long and 3"-4" in diameter.
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •