Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: proof question from a newbie

  1. #1

    Default proof question from a newbie

    Excuse my ignorance, but are all pennys with"S" mint marks proofs? I've noticed people who collect pennies look specifically for the san fran mint mark.

  2. #2

    Default

    Proof cents were produced at the Philadelphia mint until 1964. The "S" San Francisco mint began minting proof cents in 1968 until present day. According to Yeoman's Guidebook, no proof cents were minted from 1965 until 1968.
    Where ever you go, there you are.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bullseyethievery View Post
    Excuse my ignorance, but are all pennys with"S" mint marks proofs? I've noticed people who collect pennies look specifically for the san fran mint mark.

    NO, someone will answer better then my quick didn't google answer but they didn't start making proof sets until (a guess) 1950s, so all the S mint marks before that are not from proofs, example 1909 S VDB not from a proof set.
    "Don't take advice online from a stranger, then again I am not a stranger, you can ask anyone that knows me"- Me

  4. #4

    Default

    So it's safe to say the san fran mint mark are on less coins and thats what would make them more desirable to a penny collector?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,853

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bullseyethievery View Post
    So it's safe to say the san fran mint mark are on less coins and thats what would make them more desirable to a penny collector?
    No, it's not safe to say that. Some s mints are rare. Do a search on eBay for key date pennies. At least you'll be in the ballpark.

  6. #6

    Default

    Some S mint marked pennies are not proof, examples 1973 S and 1974 S were circulation strikes

    They make circulation quality S mint ATB quarters since 2012 as well
    "Great minds discuss ideas. Average minds discuss events. Small minds discuss people." - Eleanor Roosevelt
    "Guru's are liked not for being right but for saying what you want to hear" - me
    "Paper" investors dictate the price of silver - blitzdude
    "Fear and greed drive the Demand portion of investment Supply and Demand" - me
    "Silver can't be subject to classical supply and demand of silver and be driven by gold at the same time" - me
    "What's next for silver? Nobody knows" - APMEX email

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LoveTheBenjis View Post
    NO, someone will answer better then my quick didn't google answer but they didn't start making proof sets until (a guess) 1950s, so all the S mint marks before that are not from proofs, example 1909 S VDB not from a proof set.
    The United States Mint started minting proof sets with all minor coinage (1 cent, 5 cents, 10 cents, 25 cents and 50 cents) in 1936 and suspended the manufacture from 1943 through 1949 and again from 1965 through 1967...
    Build a fire and warm a man for a day.
    Set him on fire and he's warm for the rest of his life
    .:

    If you see something...Shoot something! Ima Hunter

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks for the info guys

  9. #9

    Default

    You could order proof sets from the US mint back in the 2nd half of the 19th century. Regular production of proof sets in quantity began in 1858/1859. Back then about 300-800 sets per year were produced (cent, half dime, dime, quarter, half dollar, silver dollar). You could add gold proofs to that too from 1859 ($1, $3, $5, $10, $20). I purchased an original 1900 proof set via the original family about 10 years ago. It contained 3 of the cents and nickels, one each of 10c, 25c, 50c and $1. The original paperwork from that transaction showed them ordering one regular 5 pc set + 2 extra minor sets. A lot of people ordered just minor sets or extra ones. That's why the mintages for the 1c, 3c nickel, and 5c pieces are often much higher than the bigger denominations. What was neat was that the original shipping envelope from the US mint was included as well as the mint order form for all of their products. As I recall it cost around $3.50 originally for that 1900 proof set. The coins were all still wrapped in the original mint paper. The silver coins were all graded PF65/66 while the 3 cents were the most impressive of the group, all PF66 RB with about 75-80% red w/eye popping magenta toning.

    Fwiw the mint was putting out presentation/proof sets as early as 1834 (ie King of Siam proof set with all denominations represented...the source of the coveted "1804" silver dollars). Proof sets in both silver and gold are known for the 1840's as well. They were either special ordered or some type of presentation/gift to someone important.

    Proof coins from the opening of the San Fransisco mint in 1855 are also known. There are a couple 1855-s proof $3 gold pieces and 1855-s quarters known.
    Last edited by Numisgold; 06-09-2015 at 09:01 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •