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Thread: consecutive bills

  1. #1

    Default consecutive bills

    I have many consecutive 20 and 100 us bills, how can I find out what they are worth if anything

  2. #2

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    Face. Unless the number sequence is low or repeating or the same digits or star notes.
    "trozau" (troy ounce gold)
    gold - "the barbarous relic"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by trozau View Post
    Face. Unless the number sequence is low or repeating or the same digits or star notes.
    Thank you I learned something today(star notes). Always prefered coin to paper.

  4. #4

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    I'll pay a bit more if the notes are no longer current, extreme example $1 uncirculated silver certificates

    The 2014 $1 American Coin and Currency sets are fetching more if the bills are sequential
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Silver Piranha View Post
    I have many consecutive 20 and 100 us bills, how can I find out what they are worth if anything
    If those notes are the small portrait type, I would hold on to them for future appreciation. Type notes do go up in value if they are really nice and are made of a different and earlier type than contemporary notes...
    Build a fire and warm a man for a day.
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  6. #6

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    I will have to take an inventory of what i have. I know i have large groups of uncirculated $20 and $100 bills, i think most of them are 2003.

  7. #7
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    i am fond and have a passion for the old currencies, and some of the new...i was hooked the first time i received very rare and desired $1000 note in trade back in the 1980's.....

    i have a passion for collecting the older currencies of the US... demand and interest notes from the civil war era, wild cat issues, large bills, confed, Ag and Au certs, national bank notes, small note, fractionals, colonial notes......

    from the artwork to the value in crisp examples.. i have been a very big collector and fan of such and other non currency ephrema.... newer contemporary currency ??..... from various funny#'s, star packs, to rarities of error..... one would be surprised, on what ya can get from your bank or CU if you are on your toes with the employees....

    it is all art to me, and will not die with the dollar some day!!

  8. #8

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    Sequential notes of US $1 to $100 denominations probably need to be silver certificates to be worth anything. I remember back in the mid-1970's getting a group of sequential crisp unc $10's from the bank all with a 1934 series date. The local dealers offered me $10.25 each. I just spent them. I can't imagine sequential FRN's from 2003 are worth a premium.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Numisgold View Post
    Sequential notes of US $1 to $100 denominations probably need to be silver certificates to be worth anything. I remember back in the mid-1970's getting a group of sequential crisp unc $10's from the bank all with a 1934 series date. The local dealers offered me $10.50 each. I just spent them.
    ouch in red...... but we all have done similar i suppose..

    gee just check ebay, they are hot enough to be trading in them.... folks are buying sequential notes and funnies and other, buying and buying... the older the better and yes the crisper the better... just sayin!

    inct

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by captainsilverton View Post
    ouch in red...... but we all have done similar i suppose..

    gee just check ebay, they are hot enough to be trading in them.... folks are buying sequential notes and funnies and other, buying and buying... the older the better and yes the crisper the better... just sayin!

    inct

    I spent them back in 1975/1976. I sure as heck wasn't going to give the skin-flint dealers the notes for a 2.5% profit. And keeping those $10 notes for how many decades wouldn't have been much of a return either. What are they worth today? $50? $100? In 1975 I was able to buy coins that increased 15X by 1980. And it wasn't hard to find semi-key dates in the 19th century Liberty gold and Seated silver series that over the past 40 years have increased 30X to 50X in value. One of my better pics from 1975 was an XF45 1867-s quarter for all of $130. It's worth $4,000-$5,000 today. Believe me, it was better to spend those $10 notes back in 1976. Obviously, if found today you wouldn't do that. The coin market was literally ripe for the picking back in 1975-1977. The number of outstanding values at that time was incredible. One of the greatest buying opportunities in rare coins that there ever was. The price guides were full of misinformation on most 19th century pre-1874 silver and gold coinage. As a 21 year old back then I didn't have much money to buy all the good deals that were out there.
    Last edited by Numisgold; 06-09-2015 at 09:12 PM.

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