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Thread: Magnet working on one platinum ring, but not another!?

  1. #1

    Default Magnet working on one platinum ring, but not another!?

    are they both they same density. i mean are they both pure platinum or is one merely plated. or not 100% pure. there could be other metals that effect the attraction. if there is no difference, such as an alloy, then there is no reason for this to happen

  2. #2

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    One might be white gold?

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by xmy1229 View Post
    are they both they same density. i mean are they both pure platinum or is one merely plated. or not 100% pure. there could be other metals that effect the attraction. if there is no difference, such as an alloy, then there is no reason for this to happen
    The only ferromagnetic metals (those that are attracted to a magnet) are iron, nickel and cobalt, and some of there alloys. Platinum doesn't stick to a magnet.

  4. #4

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    Yup. Hope you didn't pay for a "sticker"
    You look like I need a drink.

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  6. #6

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    I work for a Jewelry Distributor/Manufacturer/Refinery and we use Cobalt as an alloy on some of our Platinum rings. These rings will attract to a magnet. So it is possible to have a legit Platinum ring that sticks to a magnet.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by justwatchin View Post
    I work for a Jewelry Distributor/Manufacturer/Refinery and we use Cobalt as an alloy on some of our Platinum rings. These rings will attract to a magnet. So it is possible to have a legit Platinum ring that sticks to a magnet.
    No, that would be a legit platinum/cobalt ring. A legit platinum ring would be made of platinum. Betcha don't market it as platinum/cobalt ring.

  8. #8

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    wow, that is pretty funny, magnetic platinum,
    that must be the special stuff you got there.
    x 2

    At all times, and in all circumstances 'Gold' remains money... 'THE' most important money of the world.
    Heres some technical analysis:
    I got some old Silver morgans in one hand, I can feel the weight, I like the look and feel, Big, Bold, Bright !
    I got some paper dollars in the other hand, hmmm no weight, they don't feel like much; petty, fragile, Dull.
    Yep OK...........I'll stick with the old Silver morgans and get rid of this paper fiat shieat.

  9. #9

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    Most Platinum Jewelry made in the USA is Platinum using Iridium alloy or Platinum using Ruthenium alloy. They don't call that Platinum-Iridium or Platinum-Ruthenium. When jewelry is manufactured whether it be gold or platinum it is mixed with some sort of alloy. 10k is 41.7% gold the rest is alloy, 14k is 58.5% gold the rest is alloy, 18k is 75% gold the rest is alloy, and so on..... Platinum is no different! Most is 90% or 95% platinum with the rest being alloy. Platinum with Cobalt alloy is nothing new! It was developed more than 20 years ago and has been used mostly in Europe and Japan for jewelry. It was developed specifically to perform better in jewelry casting than either Platinum with Iridium alloy (Pt-Ir) or Platinum with Ruthenium alloy (Pt-Ru). Pt-Ir and Pt-Ru always show more porosity than the Pt-Co alloy. When using Cobalt you get the benefit of a denser, more solid casting without the problems that porosity can create. Platinum Jewelry cast using a Pt-Ir or Pt-Ru mix is always much rougher. A Cobalt alloy produces a smoother surface and requires less finishing, resulting in a higher finished weight and less metal loss both of which keep the manufacturing cost down. Regardless of which alloy you cast with, the piece is still Platinum!
    Last edited by justwatchin; 04-24-2015 at 06:53 AM.

  10. #10

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    ::grabs popcorn:: Watches the show..
    "Compulsory altruism is none too altruistic." - me

    "All of us necessarily hold many casual opinions that are ludicrously wrong simply because life is far too short for us to think through even a small fraction of the topics that we come across." -- Julian Simon

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