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Thread: Favorite / Prettiest/ most significant silver coin, bar, or round around ???

  1. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by windweaver77 View Post
    tell us more about these . They look purdy !!!
    Well, they are extremely high-end looking. The protective casing, the official specs, the signature of the assayer, etc, etc. They are also available in some odd sizes and Id like to eventually have one of each of the sizes they make. Just a majestic looking bar. Everytime I show one to someone, its a show stopper. Nothing I can show them after wards has the same jaw dropping effect.

    The only downside is the premiums on them are stupid and you'd be nuts to stack these things. But, any silver stacker MUST have a couple of these bars. They are my favorites by far!

    ... Let us bring him Silver and Gold!

  2. #72

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    As a coin designer, I'm biased of course.
    I think those Fortuna bars are ugly.
    But I can understand why people like them.

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcarr View Post
    As a coin designer, I'm biased of course.
    I think those Fortuna bars are ugly.
    But I can understand why people like them.
    man....thanks for sharing your designs.... again....still..

    INCT

  4. #74
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    Oct 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casparado View Post
    ^^^ Moonlight Mint makes some pretty interesting rounds. I just wish they weren't so expensive.

    I remember when they first came out with the Amero. A good buddy of mine who is quite the conspiracy theorist went nuts over it. Before he realized it was a private mint he was sure that we were about to have a bank holiday and the dollar was dead! (It reminds me of the War of the Worlds broadcast. He had about the same reaction as the public did back then...)

    Check this one out... pretty funny


    indeed...i would pay whatever for one of those i suppose.. greatest round i have seen......seen for the 1st time... awesome !

    INCT

  5. #75

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casparado View Post
    ^^^ Moonlight Mint makes some pretty interesting rounds. I just wish they weren't so expensive.

    I remember when they first came out with the Amero. A good buddy of mine who is quite the conspiracy theorist went nuts over it. Before he realized it was a private mint he was sure that we were about to have a bank holiday and the dollar was dead! (It reminds me of the War of the Worlds broadcast. He had about the same reaction as the public did back then...)

    Check this one out... pretty funny

    This is a must own for all who can afford premiums and collect pretty stuff... How would I get one? The relationship between the obverse and Reverse is the best joke I have ever seen on a silver round.

  6. #76

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    Quote Originally Posted by dcarr View Post

    And one last modern favorite:
    I really like this. Classic elaborateness.

  7. #77

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    Quote Originally Posted by windweaver77 View Post
    This is a must own for all who can afford premiums and collect pretty stuff... How would I get one? The relationship between the obverse and Reverse is the best joke I have ever seen on a silver round.
    Only 208 were minted. Issue price was $85 (higher "collector" price due to very limited mintage).

    The last couple sales on eBay were about $200 each.
    Last edited by dcarr; 07-14-2013 at 06:41 PM.

  8. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by dcarr View Post
    Only 208 were minted. Issue price was $85 (higher "collector" price due to very limited mintage).

    The last couple sales on eBay were about $200 each.
    it is cool but nothing bullion is so cool as that !!!!
    Then again if some one could flip it... just not going to be me haha Cool piece though to bad they did not make enough for others to enjoy.

  9. #79

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    how do we feel about these ? certainly not bullion but interesting none the less. I own four or five of these ( not in this condition mind you). Here is some info this from wikepedia..

    The three cent coin has an unusual history. It was proposed in 1851 both as a result of the decrease in postage rates from five cents to three and to answer the need for a small-denomination, easy-to-handle coin. The three cent silver featured a shield on a six sided star on the obverse and the Roman numeral III on the reverse. The coin was initially composed of 75% silver and 25% copper to ensure that the coin would be considered real currency yet not worth melting down for the silver. The coins were physically the lightest weight coins ever minted by the United States, weighing only 4/5 of a gram and with a diameter smaller than a modern dime and only slightly greater than the smallest gold dollars. The silver coins were known as "fishscales". The term "trimes" is often used today for these coins but that was first used by the director of the United States Mint (James Ross Snowden) at the time of their production.
    Starting in 1854, the three cent silver had its silver metal content raised to 90% in order to encourage circulation. At the same time, its weight was reduced to 3/4 of a gram by reducing thickness. The coin went through a design change at the time such that two lines were now used to border the star on the obverse and an olive sprig was added above and a bundle of arrows below the Roman numeral III on the reverse.[1] A final design change occurred in 1859 because of striking problems: the number of lines bordering the star was reduced to one, and the font was made taller and slightly more narrow.[1] The size of the date numerals also varied through the years, with 1860–1863 featuring the smallest date numerals of any US coin. In 1851 only, the New Orleans Mint struck some of the silver three-cent coins. It was minted from 1851 to 1873 at the Philadelphia Mint. In the later years there were very small mintages and the 1873 issue was in proof state only. However, an earlier date silver three cent piece can be bought in worn condition for a relatively low[vague] price. The silver three cent piece (along with the silver dollar, the half dime, and the two cent piece) was discontinued by the Coinage Act of 1873.
    Civil War era silver shortages led to widespread hoarding of all silver coins, and most one and five cent coins as well. Various alternatives were tried, including encapsulated postage and privately issued coinage. The Treasury eventually settled on issuing fractional currency. These small denomination (3 to 50 cent) notes were never popular, as they were easy to lose and unwieldy in large amounts. The answer to this issue was reached in 1865 with the introduction of the three cent nickel coin. This coin was composed of copper and nickel and was larger than the silver coin of the same denomination. The coin featured a Liberty head obverse and another Roman numeral 'III' reverse. The three cent nickel was never intended as a permanent issue, only as stopgap measure until the wartime hoarding ceased. However, production of the coin continued until 1889, 16 years after the three cent silver was discontinued. One reason often given for the discontinuation of the three cent nickel piece in 1889 is that this coin and the dime (10 cent silver coin) were identical in diameter, and hence caused confusion upon the introduction of mechanical vending machines.[dubious – discuss] Another factor may have been that in 1883 the letter postage rate dropped to 2 cents, thus removing the justification for this coin.[2]
    The three cent nickel was only minted in Philadelphia and, except for a larger date on the 1889 pieces, had no design differences throughout its run. Over the course of the series mintage declined, and some of the dates are scarce. But, with an 1865 mintage of over eleven million, a type piece can be inexpensively obtained.
    Mintage figures[edit]
    Three Cent (silver), 1851–1873
    1851 P – 5,447,400
    1851 O – 720,000
    1852 P – 18,663,500
    1853 P – 11,400,000
    1854 P – 671,000
    1855 P – 139,000
    1856 P – 1,458,000
    1857 P – 1,042,000
    1858 P – 1,603,700
    1859 P – 364,200
    1860 P – 286,000
    1861 P – 497,000
    1862 P – 343,000
    1863 P – 21,000
    1864 P – 12,000
    1865 P – 8,000
    1866 P – 22,000
    1867 P – 4,000
    1868 P – 3,500
    1869 P – 4,500
    1870 P – 3,000
    1871 P – 3,400
    1872 P – 1,000
    1873 P – 600 (ALL PROOF)
    Three Cent (nickel), 1865–1889
    1865 P – 11,382,000
    1866 P – 4,801,000
    1867 P – 3,915,000
    1868 P – 3,252,000
    1869 P – 1,604,000
    1870 P – 1,335,000
    1871 P – 604,000
    1872 P – 862,000
    1873 P – 1,173,000
    1874 P – 790,000
    1875 P – 228,000
    1876 P – 162,000
    1877 P – About 510 (ALL PROOF)
    1878 P – 2,350 (ALL PROOF)
    1879 P – 38,000
    1880 P – 21,000
    1881 P – 1,077,000
    1882 P – 22,200
    1883 P – 4,000
    1884 P – 1,700
    1885 P – 1,000
    1886 P – 4,290 (ALL PROOF)
    1887 P – 5,000
    1888 P – 36,500
    1889 P – 18,190
    Last edited by windweaver77; 07-16-2013 at 08:01 PM.

  10. #80

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    My very favorite single coin:







    2002 Kingdom of Bhutan 2000 Ngultrum. It is 1 oz .999 silver inset on one side with 1/4 oz .9999 gold. Stunning.



    Tim
    He drove a black and white pirate ship at 190 mph.
    - Dale in the #3 will never be forgotten. Thanks for the memories.

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