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Thread: Favorite / Prettiest/ most significant silver coin, bar, or round around ???

  1. #31
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    black ar guns protect the property if need be..

    arfcom lives in many forms still, so many too little time, join now your country needs you.

    INMA

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by captainsilverton View Post
    black ar guns protect the property if need be..

    arfcom lives in many forms still, so many too little time, join now your country needs you.

    INMA
    And 11 "evil black guns" later.....here I sit!!!

  3. #33

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    I own a few...
    This from Wikipedia...

    The real de a ocho (also known as the piece of eight (peso de ocho), the Spanish dollar or the eight-real coin) is a silver coin, of approximately 38 mm diameter, worth eight reales, that was minted in the Spanish Empire after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. Its purpose was to correspond to the German thaler.
    The Spanish dollar was widely used by many countries as international currency because of its uniformity in standard and milling characteristics. Some countries countersigned the Spanish dollar so it could be used as their local currency.[1]
    The Spanish dollar was the coin upon which the original United States dollar was based, and it remained legal tender in the United States until the Coinage Act of 1857. Because it was widely used in Europe, the Americas, and the Far East, it became the first world currency by the late 18th century. Aside from the U.S. dollar, several other existing currencies, such as the Canadian dollar, the Japanese yen and the Chinese yuan, as well as several currencies in Latin America, and the Philippine peso, were initially based on the Spanish dollar and other 8-reales coins. Diverse theories link the origin of the "$" symbol to the columns and stripes that appear on one side of the Spanish dollar.
    The term peso was used in Spanish to refer to this denomination, and it became the basis for many of the currencies in the former Spanish colonies, including the Argentine, Bolivian, Chilean, Colombian, Costa Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Ecuadorian, Guatemalan, Honduran, Mexican, Nicaraguan, Paraguayan, Philippines, Puerto Rican, Peruvian, Salvadoran, Uruguayan, and Venezuelan pesos.

    In the 16th century, Count Hieronymus Schlick of Bohemia began minting coins known as Joachimsthalers (from German thal, or nowadays usually Tal, "valley", cognate with "dale" in English), named for Joachimsthal, the valley in the Ore Mountains where the silver was mined (St. Joachim's Valley, now Jáchymov; then part of the Holy Roman Empire, now part of the Czech Republic).[2] Joachimstaler was later shortened to taler, a word that eventually found its way into Norwegian, Danish and Swedish as daler, Czech and Slovene as tolar, Polish as talar, Dutch as daalder, Amharic as talari, Hungarian as tallér, Italian as tallero, Greek as taliro (τάληρο), Flemish as daelder, and English as dollar.[2]
    "The Joachimsthalers weighed 451 Troy grains (29.2 g) of silver. So successful were these coins that similar thalers were minted in Burgundy and France. The Burgundian Cross Thaler, depicted the Cross of Burgundy, and was prevalent in the Burgundian Netherlands that were revolting the Spanish king Philip II, who was also Duke of Burgundy. From 1575 the Dutch revolting provinces were replacing the currency with a daalder depicting a lion, hence its Dutch name leeuwendaalder.
    Specifically to facilitate export trade, the leeuwendaalder was authorized to contain 427.16 grains of .750 fine silver, and lighter than the large denomination coins then in circulation. Clearly it was more advantageous for a Dutch merchant to pay a foreign debt in leeuwendaalders rather than in other heavier, more costly coins. Thus, the leeuwendaalder or lion dollar became the coin of choice for foreign trade. It became popular in the Middle East, the colonies in the east and in the west.
    It also circulated throughout the English colonies during the Seventeenth and early Eighteenth centuries. From New Nederland (New York) the lion dollar spread to all thirteen colonies in the west. English speakers began to apply the word "dollar" also to the Spanish peso or "piece of eight" by 1581, which was also widely used in the British North American colonies at the time of the American Revolution, hence adopted as the name of the US monetary unit in the late 18th century

    After the introduction of the Guldengroschen in Austria in 1486, the concept of a large silver coin with high purity (sometimes known as "specie" coinage) eventually spread throughout the rest of Europe. Monetary reform in Spain brought about the introduction of an 8-reales coin in 1497.


    A silver Spanish 8-Reales coin minted in México c1650
    In the following centuries, and into the 19th century, the coin was minted with several different designs at various mints in Spain and in the New World, having gained wide acceptance beyond Spain's borders. The main New World mints for Spanish dollars were at Potosí, Lima, and Mexico City (and minor mints at Bogotá, Guatemala City and Santiago), and silver dollars minted at these mints could be distinguished from the ones minted in Spain, by the Pillars of Hercules design on the reverse. In the 19th century, the coin's denomination was changed to 20 reales (based on 20 reales de vellón) and finally 2 escudos.
    Spain's adoption of the peseta and its joining the Latin Monetary Union meant the effective end for the last vestiges of the Spanish dollar in Spain itself. However, the 5-pesetas coin was slightly smaller and lighter but was also of high purity (90%) silver.
    In the 1990s, commemorative 2000-pesetas coins were minted, similar in size and weight to the 8 reales and also with high fineness.
    Mexico[edit]
    Following independence in 1821, Mexican coinage of silver reales and gold escudos followed that of Spanish lines until decimalization and the introduction of the peso. The Mexican 8-reales coin (eventually becoming a 1-peso coin) continued to be a popular international trading coin throughout the 19th century.
    After 1918, the peso was reduced in size and fineness, with further reductions in the 1940s and 1950s. However, 2- (1921), 5- (1947) and 10- (1955) peso coins were minted during the same period, similar in size and fineness to the old peso.

    The Coinage Act of 1792 created the United States Mint, but the first U.S. dollars were not as popular as the Spanish dollars, which were heavier and were made of finer silver. Indeed:
    By far the leading specie coin circulating in America was the Spanish silver dollar, defined as consisting of 387 grains of pure silver. The dollar was divided into "pieces of eight," or "bits," each consisting of one-eighth of a dollar. Spanish dollars came into the North American colonies through lucrative trade with the West Indies. The Spanish silver dollar had been the world's outstanding coin since the early 16th century, and was spread partially by dint of the vast silver output of the Spanish colonies in Latin America. More important, however, was that the Spanish dollar, from the 16th to the 19th century, was relatively the most stable and least debased coin in the Western world [8]
    An eight-real coin nominally weighed 550.209 Spanish grains, which is 423.900 troy/avoirdupois grains (0.883125 troy ounces or 27.468 grams), 0.93055 fine: so contained 0.821791 troy ounces (25.561 g) or 394.460 grains fine silver. Its weight and purity varied significantly between mints and over the centuries. In contrast, the Coinage Act of 1792 specified that the U.S. dollar would contain 371 4⁄16 grain (24.1 g) pure or 416 grain (27.0 g) standard silver. This specification was based on the average weight of a random selection of worn Spanish dollars which Hamilton caused to be weighed at the Treasury.
    The coins had a nominal value of eight reales ("royals").
    Before the American Revolution, owing to British mercantilist policies, there was a chronic shortage of British currency in Britain's colonies. Trade was often conducted with Spanish dollars that had been obtained through illicit trade with the West Indies. Spanish coinage was legal tender in the United States until an Act of Congress discontinued the practice in 1857. The pricing of equities on U.S. stock exchanges in ⅛-dollar denominations persisted until the New York Stock Exchange converted first to pricing in sixteenths of a dollar on June 24, 1997, and shortly after that, to decimal pricing.


    1888 Mexican 8 Real coin with Chinese "chop" marks
    Long tied to the lore of piracy, "pieces of eight" were manufactured in the Americas and transported in bulk back to Spain (to pay for wars and various other things), making them a very tempting target for seagoing pirates. The Manila galleons transported Mexican silver to Manila in Spanish Philippines, where it would be exchanged for Philippine and Chinese goods, since silver was the only foreign commodity China would accept. In Oriental trade, Spanish dollars were often stamped with Chinese characters known as "chop marks" which indicate that particular coin had been assayed by a well-known merchant and determined to be genuine.
    Thanks to the vast silver deposits that were found in Mexico (for example, at Taxco and Zacatecas) and Potosí in modern-day Bolivia, and to silver from Spain's possessions throughout the Americas, mints in Mexico and Peru also began to strike the coin.
    Millions of Spanish dollars were minted over the course of several centuries. They were among the most widely circulating coins of the colonial period in the Americas, and were still in use in North America and in South-East Asia in the 19th century. They had a value of one dollar when circulating in the United States, until the Coinage Act of 1857 prohibited their use (and that of any foreign currency) as legal tender.
    The coin is roughly equivalent to the silver thaler issued in Bohemia and elsewhere since 1517.
    Last edited by windweaver77; 07-11-2013 at 12:24 PM.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by windweaver77 View Post
    I own a few...

    The real de a ocho (also known as the piece of eight (peso de ocho), the Spanish dollar or the eight-real coin) is a silver coin, of approximately 38 mm diameter, worth eight reales, that was minted in the Spanish Empire after a Spanish currency reform in 1497. Its purpose was to correspond to the German thaler.
    The Spanish dollar was widely used by many countries as international currency because of its uniformity in standard and milling characteristics. Some countries countersigned the Spanish dollar so it could be used as their local currency.[1]
    The Spanish dollar was the coin upon which the original United States dollar was based, and it remained legal tender in the United States until the Coinage Act of 1857. Because it was widely used in Europe, the Americas, and the Far East, it became the first world currency by the late 18th century. Aside from the U.S. dollar, several other existing currencies, such as the Canadian dollar, the Japanese yen and the Chinese yuan, as well as several currencies in Latin America, and the Philippine peso, were initially based on the Spanish dollar and other 8-reales coins. Diverse theories link the origin of the "$" symbol to the columns and stripes that appear on one side of the Spanish dollar.
    The term peso was used in Spanish to refer to this denomination, and it became the basis for many of the currencies in the former Spanish colonies, including the Argentine, Bolivian, Chilean, Colombian, Costa Rican, Cuban, Dominican, Ecuadorian, Guatemalan, Honduran, Mexican, Nicaraguan, Paraguayan, Philippines, Puerto Rican, Peruvian, Salvadoran, Uruguayan, and Venezuelan pesos.

    In the 16th century, Count Hieronymus Schlick of Bohemia began minting coins known as Joachimsthalers (from German thal, or nowadays usually Tal, "valley", cognate with "dale" in English), named for Joachimsthal, the valley in the Ore Mountains where the silver was mined (St. Joachim's Valley, now Jáchymov; then part of the Holy Roman Empire, now part of the Czech Republic).[2] Joachimstaler was later shortened to taler, a word that eventually found its way into Norwegian, Danish and Swedish as daler, Czech and Slovene as tolar, Polish as talar, Dutch as daalder, Amharic as talari, Hungarian as tallér, Italian as tallero, Greek as taliro (τάληρο), Flemish as daelder, and English as dollar.[2]
    "The Joachimsthalers weighed 451 Troy grains (29.2 g) of silver. So successful were these coins that similar thalers were minted in Burgundy and France. The Burgundian Cross Thaler, depicted the Cross of Burgundy, and was prevalent in the Burgundian Netherlands that were revolting the Spanish king Philip II, who was also Duke of Burgundy. From 1575 the Dutch revolting provinces were replacing the currency with a daalder depicting a lion, hence its Dutch name leeuwendaalder.
    Specifically to facilitate export trade, the leeuwendaalder was authorized to contain 427.16 grains of .750 fine silver, and lighter than the large denomination coins then in circulation. Clearly it was more advantageous for a Dutch merchant to pay a foreign debt in leeuwendaalders rather than in other heavier, more costly coins. Thus, the leeuwendaalder or lion dollar became the coin of choice for foreign trade. It became popular in the Middle East, the colonies in the east and in the west.
    It also circulated throughout the English colonies during the Seventeenth and early Eighteenth centuries. From New Nederland (New York) the lion dollar spread to all thirteen colonies in the west. English speakers began to apply the word "dollar" also to the Spanish peso or "piece of eight" by 1581, which was also widely used in the British North American colonies at the time of the American Revolution, hence adopted as the name of the US monetary unit in the late 18th century

    After the introduction of the Guldengroschen in Austria in 1486, the concept of a large silver coin with high purity (sometimes known as "specie" coinage) eventually spread throughout the rest of Europe. Monetary reform in Spain brought about the introduction of an 8-reales coin in 1497.


    A silver Spanish 8-Reales coin minted in México c1650
    In the following centuries, and into the 19th century, the coin was minted with several different designs at various mints in Spain and in the New World, having gained wide acceptance beyond Spain's borders. The main New World mints for Spanish dollars were at Potosí, Lima, and Mexico City (and minor mints at Bogotá, Guatemala City and Santiago), and silver dollars minted at these mints could be distinguished from the ones minted in Spain, by the Pillars of Hercules design on the reverse. In the 19th century, the coin's denomination was changed to 20 reales (based on 20 reales de vellón) and finally 2 escudos.
    Spain's adoption of the peseta and its joining the Latin Monetary Union meant the effective end for the last vestiges of the Spanish dollar in Spain itself. However, the 5-pesetas coin was slightly smaller and lighter but was also of high purity (90%) silver.
    In the 1990s, commemorative 2000-pesetas coins were minted, similar in size and weight to the 8 reales and also with high fineness.
    Mexico[edit]
    Following independence in 1821, Mexican coinage of silver reales and gold escudos followed that of Spanish lines until decimalization and the introduction of the peso. The Mexican 8-reales coin (eventually becoming a 1-peso coin) continued to be a popular international trading coin throughout the 19th century.
    After 1918, the peso was reduced in size and fineness, with further reductions in the 1940s and 1950s. However, 2- (1921), 5- (1947) and 10- (1955) peso coins were minted during the same period, similar in size and fineness to the old peso.

    The Coinage Act of 1792 created the United States Mint, but the first U.S. dollars were not as popular as the Spanish dollars, which were heavier and were made of finer silver. Indeed:
    By far the leading specie coin circulating in America was the Spanish silver dollar, defined as consisting of 387 grains of pure silver. The dollar was divided into "pieces of eight," or "bits," each consisting of one-eighth of a dollar. Spanish dollars came into the North American colonies through lucrative trade with the West Indies. The Spanish silver dollar had been the world's outstanding coin since the early 16th century, and was spread partially by dint of the vast silver output of the Spanish colonies in Latin America. More important, however, was that the Spanish dollar, from the 16th to the 19th century, was relatively the most stable and least debased coin in the Western world [8]
    An eight-real coin nominally weighed 550.209 Spanish grains, which is 423.900 troy/avoirdupois grains (0.883125 troy ounces or 27.468 grams), 0.93055 fine: so contained 0.821791 troy ounces (25.561 g) or 394.460 grains fine silver. Its weight and purity varied significantly between mints and over the centuries. In contrast, the Coinage Act of 1792 specified that the U.S. dollar would contain 371 4⁄16 grain (24.1 g) pure or 416 grain (27.0 g) standard silver. This specification was based on the average weight of a random selection of worn Spanish dollars which Hamilton caused to be weighed at the Treasury.
    The coins had a nominal value of eight reales ("royals").
    Before the American Revolution, owing to British mercantilist policies, there was a chronic shortage of British currency in Britain's colonies. Trade was often conducted with Spanish dollars that had been obtained through illicit trade with the West Indies. Spanish coinage was legal tender in the United States until an Act of Congress discontinued the practice in 1857. The pricing of equities on U.S. stock exchanges in ⅛-dollar denominations persisted until the New York Stock Exchange converted first to pricing in sixteenths of a dollar on June 24, 1997, and shortly after that, to decimal pricing.


    1888 Mexican 8 Real coin with Chinese "chop" marks
    Long tied to the lore of piracy, "pieces of eight" were manufactured in the Americas and transported in bulk back to Spain (to pay for wars and various other things), making them a very tempting target for seagoing pirates. The Manila galleons transported Mexican silver to Manila in Spanish Philippines, where it would be exchanged for Philippine and Chinese goods, since silver was the only foreign commodity China would accept. In Oriental trade, Spanish dollars were often stamped with Chinese characters known as "chop marks" which indicate that particular coin had been assayed by a well-known merchant and determined to be genuine.
    Thanks to the vast silver deposits that were found in Mexico (for example, at Taxco and Zacatecas) and Potosí in modern-day Bolivia, and to silver from Spain's possessions throughout the Americas, mints in Mexico and Peru also began to strike the coin.
    Millions of Spanish dollars were minted over the course of several centuries. They were among the most widely circulating coins of the colonial period in the Americas, and were still in use in North America and in South-East Asia in the 19th century. They had a value of one dollar when circulating in the United States, until the Coinage Act of 1857 prohibited their use (and that of any foreign currency) as legal tender.
    The coin is roughly equivalent to the silver thaler issued in Bohemia and elsewhere since 1517.

    good info...you should quote your source (s) however... especially if taken and copied verbatim in certain paragraphs from such sources.....

    enjoy the day...
    ww

    INMA

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by SoxFan1203 View Post
    And 11 "evil black guns" later.....here I sit!!!
    ha lol....good quip and cool...right on.

    INMA

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by captainsilverton View Post
    good info...you should quote your source (s) however... especially if taken and copied verbatim in certain paragraphs from such sources.....

    enjoy the day...
    ww

    INMA
    yeah I agree plagiarism is not cool ...

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by windweaver77 View Post
    yeah I agree plagiarism is not cool ...
    its easy enough to do , in a rush to post info... though i personally do not feel anyone here is trying to say its their own words, but trying to post useful info only...which i took yours as.. i like you like foreign coins, though i stick to high content ASW coins.... anyway i believe it is a forum rule, and have been guilty of it myself ...

    INMA

  8. #38

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    I don't really have anything special but my prized possession would be my 25oz MPM bar. Love that thing!!!!
    "Gold is the money of kings; silver is the money of gentlemen; barter is the money of peasants; but debt is the money of slaves."

    Feedback: +5

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by NjStacker22 View Post
    I don't really have anything special but my prized possession would be my 25oz MPM bar. Love that thing!!!!
    tell us about it.. where was it made? what did it cost ya? Where can we get one? Why do we want one? Gotta photo?

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattFish68 View Post
    Wow. Cool coin. Any idea who the model was for that coin ?
    this would be a round technically... as it is not a government issue.

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