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Thread: Favorite / Prettiest/ most significant silver coin, bar, or round around ???

  1. #111

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    The kilo mexican libertad is a wonderful coin
    Psalm 119:72 The law of Your mouth is better to me than thousands of gold and silver pieces.

  2. #112

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ember View Post
    Personally I really like the Ceilings of Heaven nano coins.
    can you tell us more about these coins? What do they weigh ? How many ya got? what do they look like, smell like, taste like? Are they 100% silver? Do they make them anymore? Sounds really fun.
    Quote Originally Posted by scrane View Post
    I would say the Morgan silver dollar because its bold design represented the US as a rich and powerful nation of that period.
    Do you have any fun personal stories about Morgan dollars? Maybe you have a favorite like a CC that you would love to tell us about. Morgans sure are neat.

    Quote Originally Posted by audiotom View Post
    The kilo mexican libertad is a wonderful coin
    Can you share some more about when this was made? why it was made? Was it an official government release? Sounds pretty cool.

  3. #113

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    While doing my DCA yesterday I noticed a few Mexican Numi purchases had jacked up my DCA pretty good. We already covered the Spanish colonials but we have not discussed the lovely afterbirth that is the Spanish Cap and Ray Reales and second Republic Peso.



    I personally own three 8 reales and other various denominations; but would love to own many many more.
    here are some specs
    Composition: Silver
    Fineness: 0.9030
    Weight: 27.07g
    ASW: 0.7859oz

    This from Wikipedia: The real was a currency of Mexico, issued until 1897. There were 16 silver reales to 1 gold escudo, with 8 tlacos to the real. The peso, which circulated alongside the real and eventually replaced it, was equal to 8 reales.
    The first reales issued in Mexico were Spanish colonial reales. These were followed in 1822 by independent issues of Mexico. In 1863, Mexico began issuing a decimal currency based on the peso but coins denominated in reales (in particular 8 reales coins) continued to be minted until 1897.

    During the Mexican War of Independence (1810-1821), numerous mints operated, providing coins for both the supporters and opponents of the Spanish crown. The Royalist issued coins at mints in Chihuahua, Durango, Guadalajara, Guanajuato, Nueva Viscaya, Oaxaca, Real del Catorce, San Fernando de Bexar, San Luis Potosí, Sombrerete, Valladolid Michoacán and Zacatecas. Most Royalist issues were similar in style to the earlier colonial issues from the Mexico City mint with no new denominations issed.
    Insurgent coins were minted at various locations including Nueva Galicia, Oaxaca, Puebla and Veracruz. There were also issues made in the names of the Supreme National Congress of America, the National Congress and the American Congress which, although considered Insurgent issues, bore the titles of Ferdinand VII. Both Royalists and Insurgents also issued countermarked pieces.

    Between 1821 and 1823, coins were issued by the government of Agustín de Iturbide. There were copper ⅛ and ¼ real, silver ½, 1, 2 and 8 reales, and gold 4 and 8 escudos.
    The obverses of the silver and gold coins carried a variety of portraits of the Emperor with the legend "August(inus) Dei Prov(identia)" and the date, or "Augustinus Dei Providentia" and the date. The reverse had several different versions of the Mexican eagle, a golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos). It was a traditional symbol of the Aztecs, but it was changed according to European heraldic traditions (see Coat of Arms of Mexico). The legends read "Mex I Imperator Constiiut" together with the denomination and assayer's initials.

    With the adoption of the 1824 republican constitution, the United Mexican States began issuing coins. There were silver ½, 1, 2, 4 and 8 reales, and gold ½, 1, 2, 4 and 8 escudos, with silver ¼ reales added in 1842. Copper coins for 1⁄16, ⅛ and ¼ real were issued both by the Federal government at the Mexico City mint and by the state governments at various mints around the country.
    On the republic's coins, the Mexican eagle moved to the obverse, with the legend "República Mexicana". The reverse featured a liberty cap with rays behind. The legend on the reverse reads "-denomination- -mintmark- -date- -assayer's initials- 10 Ds. 20 Gs." Mexico used the medieval system of dineros and granos to measure the fineness of their coins, twelve dineros designating pure silver with each dinero divided into 24 granos. A coin of 10 Ds. 20 Gs equated to .902777 fine.
    The brief reign of Maximillian (1864–67) interrupted the production of republic type coins and many of the denominations ceased production either in 1863 or by 1870, as the decimal currency based on the peso was introduced. However, 8 reales coins continued in production until 1897.
    Last edited by windweaver77; 07-26-2013 at 06:35 AM.

  4. #114

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    The ceilings of heaven is a new series. .999 1oz and mintage of 999 ea
    There is now two in this series. The second is yet to be released as far as I know. It is titled Raphael Rooms

    Here is the first in the series- The Sistine Chapel


    There is a nano chip embedded onto each coin with the entire works of Michelangelo. You need a very strong loop or microscope to view, but it is amazing in person. Very unique.
    http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo105/Sparkie6678/Kitco%20Contests/Trophies/SilverTrophy1.jpg

  5. #115

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ember View Post
    The ceilings of heaven is a new series. .999 1oz and mintage of 999 ea
    There is now two in this series. The second is yet to be released as far as I know. It is titled Raphael Rooms

    Here is the first in the series- The Sistine Chapel


    There is a nano chip embedded onto each coin with the entire works of Michelangelo. You need a very strong loop or microscope to view, but it is amazing in person. Very unique.
    wow that is an interesting hunk of metal there. So what was the initial asking price and about how much could one expect to pay now? found a video on it http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=mK4wSj8y0UI
    Last edited by windweaver77; 09-07-2013 at 03:05 PM.

  6. #116

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    I don't remember to be honest. Was probably around $299 original issue price. Much the same price range as the Tiffany/window series. I'm just waiting for the second in the series to become available.
    http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo105/Sparkie6678/Kitco%20Contests/Trophies/SilverTrophy1.jpg

  7. #117

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ember View Post
    I don't remember to be honest. Was probably around $299 original issue price. Much the same price range as the Tiffany/window series. I'm just waiting for the second in the series to become available.
    with only 999 minted you would think it would be a short window and a short list of people...

  8. #118

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    I don't think it is well known. Many people have never seen or heard of the series that I have spoken with.
    http://i366.photobucket.com/albums/oo105/Sparkie6678/Kitco%20Contests/Trophies/SilverTrophy1.jpg

  9. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ember View Post
    I don't think it is well known. Many people have never seen or heard of the series that I have spoken with.
    When you do get one be sure to share with the rest of the class although I must say a 1000% plus mark up seems awfully steep. I do not mind looking at any silver though and do appreciate the finer things...
    Last edited by windweaver77; 07-29-2013 at 12:56 PM.

  10. #120

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    Capped Bust Half Dollar
    Comp.: .892 Silver, .3866 oz. ASW
    Weight: 13.48 grams
    Dia.: 32.5 mm
    Obv.: Draped bust left, flanked by stars, date at right angle below
    Rev.: "50 C." below eagle
    Designer: John Reich

    I own two of these. This is from Cappedbusthalfdollar.org: Introduced in 1807, the Capped Bust Half Dollars represented the third design for the denomination. This design would be used until 1836, and in slightly modified form until 1839, before being replaced. Production for the series would be relatively high, with mintages usually extending into the millions. Silver Dollars had not been minted since 1804, making the half dollar the coin of choice for silver depositors of the era. Across the higher mintages, many different varieties were created. These die varieties are heavily collected, and as such, rare varieties can sell for remarkable premiums. Capped Bust Half Dollar
    1807-1839 Capped Bust Half Dollars

    Capped Bust Half Dollars
    Introduced in 1807, the Capped Bust Half Dollars represented the third design for the denomination. This design would be used until 1836, and in slightly modified form until 1839, before being replaced. Production for the series would be relatively high, with mintages usually extending into the millions. Silver Dollars had not been minted since 1804, making the half dollar the coin of choice for silver depositors of the era. Across the higher mintages, many different varieties were created. These die varieties are heavily collected, and as such, rare varieties can sell for remarkable premiums.

    The designer of the Capped Bust Half Dollar was John Reich, an immigrant from Germany who came to the United States in the early 19th century. He was recommended by President Thomas Jefferson to become an assistant engraver at the United States Mint in 1801. However, he would not take the position until 1807 since Robert Scot, chief engraver and designer of most of the early United States coins, had refused an assistant. John Reich was eventually hired when the health and eye sight of Scot began to decline. One of Reich’s first tasks was to redesign circulating coinage, which all featured Scot’s designs.
    The obverse of Reich’s new design features the bust of Liberty, facing left. She is wearing a cap, which is referred to as a Phrygian or Freedom Cap, a symbol of the American Revolutionary War. Liberty’s hair is curling and flowing gently downwards and a small part of her dress can be seen just below the neck. There are seven stars in front and six additional stars behind, representing the original thirteen states in the Union. The headband carries the inscription LIBERTY, and the date, slightly curved, is seen beneath the portrait.
    The reverse of the Capped Bust Half Dollar would be featured in various forms on much of the silver coinage of the 19th century. It features an American Bald Eagle, with wings spread and a bundle of arrows and an olive branch in its claws. A scroll above the eagle includes the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM, and nearly fully around is UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. The denomination, which is expressed as 50 C., is below the eagle. Reich was the first designer who consistently included the denomination within his designs.
    In 1836 Reich’s designs were replaced by slightly modified versions prepared by Christian Gobrecht. It was also at this time when the weight, diameter, and edge of the half dollar were changed. The most noticeable of the changes in design were the removal of the banner on the reverse including the motto E PLURIBUS UNUM and the update of the denomination to read 50 CENTS. In 1838 the denomination would be modified again, replaced with HALF DOL.
    Last edited by windweaver77; 07-29-2013 at 04:53 AM.

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