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Thread: Mississippi going dry?

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  1. #1

    Default Mississippi going dry?

    Looks like it may close up to barge traffic before the summer is over. Around me just south of Chicago in the heart of corn county it is the worst I have seen in all my years. Our local river is about down to nothing.

    But if it closes it looks like the railroads and trucking will have to take up the slack.

    The Mighty Mississippi to Run Dry?
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

  2. #2

    Default

    I heard last week that the Mighty Mississippi was at one foot above sea level at the Alton, IL locks and dams. I am not a hydrologist, but if it goes below sea level, won't it stop flowing?
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  3. #3

    Default

    Well that would seem likely but they do have locks to raise the boats up. Just very little water to fill the locks. My local rive basin has three USGS water level and flow meters on it, All show no flow at all and within 2' of the base river bed elevation at that point.
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

  4. #4

    Default

    Frightening!

    How soon will this begin affecting reservoirs, and hydo electric production?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,358

    Default

    I wish I had thought this way last week, as I was at a barge terminal last wednesday, I could have asked them. My work takes me to thier shop back
    inside the bluff. (storage mine or cave).
    But come to think of it, I don't remember any barges at the dock and only saw one grain truck the 45 minutes I was there. I usually see 6-10 trucks scattered thru the process. This is at Clayton, 40 miles North of Dubuque.

    Iowa is running about 50% loss on the corn, so there may not be any slack in
    shipping to make up, depends on what is sold where.

    The drought report the other day, also raised Iowa from like 27% in Extreme Drought to 67% of the State in Extreme Drought.

    Looking at the Mississippi I didn't notice any difference, but I wasn't looking for it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    3,335

    Default

    Minnesota River (Miss tributary) has little if any current, pools are stagnant with algae growing.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by redraspberry View Post
    Looks like it may close up to barge traffic before the summer is over. Around me just south of Chicago in the heart of corn county it is the worst I have seen in all my years. Our local river is about down to nothing.

    But if it closes it looks like the railroads and trucking will have to take up the slack.

    The Mighty Mississippi to Run Dry?
    capacity barge traffic is down by about a third, they cannot load as much, and some locations cannot even handle empty barges, due to the draft being reduced on the barges...

    we need rain..lots
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  8. #8

    Default 11 mile stretch closed today

    Down in Mississippi closed for dredging until further notice.

    11-mile stretch of Mississippi River closed
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

  9. #9

    Default Ah yes...

    Quote Originally Posted by redraspberry View Post
    Down in Mississippi closed for dredging until further notice.

    11-mile stretch of Mississippi River closed
    Just north of downtown Memphis on Friday, the dredge Hurley was cutting a 2,000-foot swath of river bottom to ensure that the channel is safe for vessels. The dredge is referred to as a dustpan, which means it uses a vacuum-like suction to suck up sand from the river bottom, said its captain, Frank Segree.
    The Hurley can dredge to a depth of 75 feet and can remove up to 5,000 cubic yards of sediment per hour. That's enough to fill about 68 backyard swimming pools in one hour.


    After the sand is removed, it is then pushed through a 1,200 foot pipeline that deposits it on the banks of the river. For safety's sake, the dredge tries to make the channel deeper than the required 9-foot mark whenever possible, Segree said.


    The 350-foot long dredge is powered by three 16-cylinder engines that generate 10,000 horsepower combined, yet the vessel was moving just .12 miles per hour as it slowly removed the sand from the channel
    And who cleans out the "lint trap"...

    Its probably just dirty laundry...but they probably get to keep the pickings or winnings.
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  10. #10

    Default

    Probably dredging up years of pollutants.
    What's the Frequency, Kenneth?

    432Hz

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