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Thread: Interesting statistics about U.S. silver

  1. #1

    Default Interesting statistics about U.S. silver

    In 1918 US mine production was 2,120 metric tons, imports 2,220 and exports….7,860…. world production was 6,140. Apparent consumption of silver was 420 tonnes

    From above we can see that:
    • Current US silver production is 1000 metric tones smaller than was in 1918
    • US silver export in 1918 was bigger than world silver production that year.
    • consumption of silver in US was 5 times smaller than US production.

    In 1935 US mine production was 1,520 m/t, imports…..14,700m/t, export…156m/t, world production 6,890m/t, apparent consumption…………….. only! 165m/t

    From above we can see that:
    • Current US silver production is 300m/t smaller than was in 1935
    • the rest of stats do not make sense… why US imported almost twice the amount of world silver production that year? When apparent use of silver was ten times lower than US production? Can anybody solve that puzzle?

    Numbers taken from U.S. Geological Survey
    https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&q...qk7sMH7A&pli=1
    Everything I write in my posts is just my opinion.

  2. #2

    Default stockpiles

    you need to know the size of stockpiles sitting around or added to or being subtracted from. what does consumption consist of? what's included or what's not. what column does coinage come under.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coindog View Post
    you need to know the size of stockpiles sitting around or added to or being subtracted from. what does consumption consist of? what's included or what's not. what column does coinage come under.
    Well, I can't answer your question as such data was not included with those statistics. I doubt needs for more coinage would explain sudden need to import almost twice the amount of world silver production. Can yo imagine situation when today USA would import 1.5 billion oz of silver? I believe in 1935 US was still in recession so maybe this was somehow related to New Deal Programs but anyway it is mind boggling why such huge silver import was needed for government... wouldn't be cheaper to pay for them with paper bills or confiscated gold? At that time USA was still producing almost quarter of world silver.
    Everything I write in my posts is just my opinion.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jbsilver View Post
    In 1935 US mine production was 1,520 m/t, imports…..14,700m/t, export…156m/t, world production 6,890m/t, apparent consumption…………….. only! 165m/t

    From above we can see that:
    • Current US silver production is 300m/t smaller than was in 1935
    • the rest of stats do not make sense… why US imported almost twice the amount of world silver production that year? When apparent use of silver was ten times lower than US production? Can anybody solve that puzzle?Numbers taken from U.S. Geological Survey
    i may have your answer, check posting #23 https://www.kitcomm.com/showthread.php?t=104478&page=3

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
    i may have your answer, check posting #23 https://www.kitcomm.com/showthread.php?t=104478&page=3
    WOW! Thanks yellowsnow. I think the answer in your post (#23) is correct. I recommend anybody to read it... it not only answer the puzzle but is showing how important role silver played and why banksters do everything they can to not alowing silver to be viewed as money.

    "Looking back, it is clear the western bankers had crashed the chinese silver based economy to impose their central bank fiat monetary system onto china. Dr Sun Yat Sun is a pro-democracy leader and china was doing great under the silver standard but need to be brought down as the western govt/bankers can not let china rise above them. Bankers use the try and true tactic of wars as mean to bankrupt a country and/or change of a regime. "

    It looks like nothing changed in bankster atitude toward silver since then... maybe with exception of current policy of China... for some reason they no longer want to export their silver and are buying with both hands but not paper silver but real one.
    Everything I write in my posts is just my opinion.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jbsilver View Post
    WOW! Thanks yellowsnow. I think the answer in your post (#23) is correct. I recommend anybody to read it... it not only answer the puzzle but is showing how important role silver played and why banksters do everything they can to not alowing silver to be viewed as money.

    "Looking back, it is clear the western bankers had crashed the chinese silver based economy to impose their central bank fiat monetary system onto china. Dr Sun Yat Sun is a pro-democracy leader and china was doing great under the silver standard but need to be brought down as the western govt/bankers can not let china rise above them. Bankers use the try and true tactic of wars as mean to bankrupt a country and/or change of a regime. "

    It looks like nothing changed in bankster atitude toward silver since then... maybe with exception of current policy of China... for some reason they no longer want to export their silver and are buying with both hands but not paper silver but real one.
    another lesson is: The chinese were too happy to unload their silver for great prices that US was offering. In the end, the chinese got high inflation. Furthermore, the fiat the chinese got for their silver end up being worthless as the commie took power, all the pre-commie money are deemed worthless. Of course they worth something now as numi, many chinese now want to own a piece of their history. That's why we r seeing big jump in numi prices of old chinese coinage and even paper money. I saw some old chinese promissary notes that my dealers have and he wanted plenty fiat for those old chinese papers. In coin shows, i see couple of agents scouring around for old chinese money and bot up what they can.
    Last edited by yellowsnow; 05-14-2012 at 09:46 PM.

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